Missionaries of Hate

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), January 6, 2010 | Go to article overview

Missionaries of Hate


Byline: The Register-Guard

Many Oregonians would just as soon forget about Scott Lively, the former gung-ho communications director of the Oregon Citizens Alliance who played a pivotal role in promoting divisive anti-gay initiatives in Oregon in the 1990s.

Nearly a decade later, Lively and his anti-gay vitriol have seeped back into the news. This time it's not in Oregon but in Uganda. The New York Times reports that Lively and two other U.S. fundamentalist Christians gave talks in Uganda last year warning about "the whole hidden and dark" gay agenda and the dire threat they said homosexuals pose to African children and families.

Thousands of Ugandans, including national politicians, police officers and teachers, attended the three-day presentation last March by Lively, who has written several books against homosexuality. Other presenters included Caleb Lee Brundidge, a self-described former gay man who leads "healing seminars," and Don Schmierer, a board member of Exodus International, whose mission is "mobilizing the body of Christ to minister grace and truth to a world impacted by homosexuality."

A few weeks after the conference, a little-known Ugandan politician introduced the "Anti-Homosexuality Bill of 2009," which would impose a death sentence for homosexual behavior. Lively, Brundidge and Schmierer insist they had no intention of inspiring the bill and strongly oppose it.

However, Ugandan organizers of the March conference say they helped draft the bill, and Lively reportedly has acknowledged meeting with Ugandan officials to discuss it. The Times says Lively wrote on his blog last March that his presentation had been called "a nuclear bomb against the gay agenda in Uganda. …

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