Enjoy Some Museum Magic; A Campaign to Make Family Tickets for Museums in Britain Available to All Is Great News If You Don't Have the Traditional "Two Adult, Two Child" Set-Up. and, If You Are Thinking of Visiting the UK Soon, Here's Your Chance to Win One of 100 Family Tickets to a Top Exhibition Too

The Mirror (London, England), January 15, 2010 | Go to article overview

Enjoy Some Museum Magic; A Campaign to Make Family Tickets for Museums in Britain Available to All Is Great News If You Don't Have the Traditional "Two Adult, Two Child" Set-Up. and, If You Are Thinking of Visiting the UK Soon, Here's Your Chance to Win One of 100 Family Tickets to a Top Exhibition Too


Byline: Claire O'Boyle

As families get more diverse, it's time everything else caught up. That's why British government minister Ed Balls has launched a campaign to make museums accessible to every kind of family.

The Flexible Family Ticket campaign, funded by his department for Children, Schools and Families, kicked off yesterday at London's British Museum.

It's supported by charity Kids In Museums which aims to promote galleries and museums.

But campaigners want your help to decide how to do it.

"We want all families, whatever their shape or size, to enjoy the magic of museums and galleries - together," says Mr Balls.

"That's why we have asked Kids In Museums to do a national consultation. Grandparents, aunts and uncles as well as children of all ages should benefit from family-discounted tickets and we want to make sure that all museums and galleries adopt a flexible approach."

"When I was young, going to a museum was a chore. It was always part of a school trip where you had to be quiet and look at things through glass and not touch anything. Now though you can really get involved in history and experience it for yourself."

He continues: "And as much as this campaign is about getting children into museums, we want families to enjoy these experiences together and it should apply to all sorts of families."

Broadcaster and mum-of-two Mariella Frostrup backs the campaign. She says: "It's so fantastic to see little ones gazing up at the skeleton of a dinosaur or finding out the facts behind films like Indiana Jones. Children learn best when they're able to get their hands dirty and interact with what they're learning."

Here are 10 great days out, and remember: a lot of national museums in Britain are free.

(1) Eureka Children's Museum, Halifax

One of the top museums geared towards kids, it features more than 400 interactive exhibits to teach youngsters about the world around them through play and discovery. www.eureka.org.uk.

(2) Natural History Museum, London

Great for kids fascinated with Illustration by Quentin Blake dinosaurs and other exciting creatures. www.nhm.ac.uk.

(3) Science Museum, London

Lots of hands-on, interactive stuff to keep children busy while they're learning about the past, present and future of technology. www.sciencemuseum.org.uk.

(4) FACT cinema and art gallery, Liverpool

Get your teenagers excited about art at the Space Invaders exhibition which explores the blurred boundaries between videogame spaces and real spaces.

www.fact.co.uk.

(5) British Museum, London

Families can try out the Moctezuma Exhibition and learn about the Aztec civilisations and the life of the last elected ruler. …

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Enjoy Some Museum Magic; A Campaign to Make Family Tickets for Museums in Britain Available to All Is Great News If You Don't Have the Traditional "Two Adult, Two Child" Set-Up. and, If You Are Thinking of Visiting the UK Soon, Here's Your Chance to Win One of 100 Family Tickets to a Top Exhibition Too
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