Fun House Frolics; Richard Edmonds Is Delighted by an Insight into Horace Walpole's Strawberry Hill Home

The Birmingham Post (England), January 14, 2010 | Go to article overview

Fun House Frolics; Richard Edmonds Is Delighted by an Insight into Horace Walpole's Strawberry Hill Home


Byline: Richard Edmonds

Horace Walpole's Strawberry Hill Edited by Michael Snodin (Yale pounds 40) Horace Walpole (1717-97) flourished at the heart of the 18th century. Bitchy, witty, snobbish and above all else the prince of English letter-writers, Walpole emerges gradually but clearly through the several essays which make up this beautiful illustrated book set around Walpole's house at Strawberry Hill.

The house was a magnet for poets, writers, actors, artists, politicians and society figures who brought gossip and news down from London. Among them were the poet, Thomas Gray, whose celebrated work Elegy in a Country Churchyard, might never have been written or published without Walpole's encour-r agement and support, the actress Kitty Clive - huge and deeply funny - who ended her days in a cottage on the Strawberry Hill estate benefacted by Walpole, who adored her, George II's mistress, Lady Suffolk, who entertained Walpole's dinner guests with wicked stories of her days in the royal limelight, and many more.

But the visitors left their own anecdotes behind along with the latest news, all of which Walpole collected in his notebooks (often more caustic and vicious than the carefully edited diaries suggest). For example, one of Walpole's circle of friends was George Selwyn, celebrated for his wit, his languid manner and his obsession with necrophilia!

"If Mr Selwyn calls in," said the politician Charles James Fox, when he was dying, "show him up. If I'm alive I'll be pleased to see him, and if I've died, he'll certainly be pleased to see me."

But at the centre of all this hubbub of conflicting and contrasting personalities was Walpole himself, industrious and clever. In fact, Walpole's works of garden and art history (the Essay On Modern Garden-n ing, published in 1780, for example) are still in use today and of course everything centred on Strawberry Hill - still with us and near the Thames at Twickenham.

Visitors to this gorgeous Gothic folly abounded and during its building and later when it was a show-w piece of antiques and curiosities, Walpole was continuingly besieged by both connoisseurs and the simple sightseer, all of them anxious to criticise or praise the extraordinary building Walpole had erected with its castellated roof and Gothic pinnacles.

"My house is full of people and has been so from the instant I breakfasted and more are coming," complained Walpole in September 1763 as the house moved towards completion. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Fun House Frolics; Richard Edmonds Is Delighted by an Insight into Horace Walpole's Strawberry Hill Home
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.