'Many Hands Lighten the Load'

By Clinton, Bill | Newsweek, January 25, 2010 | Go to article overview

'Many Hands Lighten the Load'


Clinton, Bill, Newsweek


Byline: Bill Clinton

Helping Haiti helps us all.

Haiti suffered the worst catastrophe in its history last week. Given all the nation has been through in the last 200 years, that is saying something.

We have all seen the heartbreaking scenes of hospitals collapsed, government buildings in rubble, people young and old lying injured or dead in the street, and a cloud of dust hanging over Port-au-Prince--a city I have cherished and visited many times since Hillary and I took our delayed honeymoon there in 1975. Haiti is a poor, tragically deforested nation, but it is rich in history, human potential, and human spirit. Haiti was the second nation in the New World to declare its independence, just after the United States. It did so despite greater adversity than we Americans faced--we had to deal with the British, but Haiti's founders at different times stared down the militaries of France, England, and Spain.

I am grateful they did. The central third of the United States--the Louisiana Purchase--became American when Napoleon decided to sell it to Thomas Jefferson, a decision he reached after concluding he could not defeat the brave people fighting in Haiti for their freedom. That territory includes my native state of Arkansas.

As president, I worked to end a violent military dictatorship and to restore Haiti's elected president. After leaving the White House, I continued to work in Haiti through my foundation, partnering with the government to increase treatment for and reduce the prevalence of HIV/AIDS and other diseases.

After a series of hurricanes battered the coast of Haiti in 2008, I made a call to action at the annual meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative for commitments to help rebuild the country. CGI members responded by pledging more than $100 million for efforts that included providing immediate disaster relief and rebuilding damaged bridges.

In June 2009, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon asked me to become the U.N. special envoy for Haiti, a role I was honored to accept. I've traveled to the region a number of times to encourage investment and spur job creation, and to increase nongovernmental activity and aid from governments and multilateral organizations. We had made a good start in rebuilding after the storms, and in addressing disease, political unrest, and deforestation, largely because of the Haitian government's commitment to implement its comprehensive plan for sustainable development and because of the unprecedented interest in the country's progress on the part of neighbors, the Haitian diaspora, and thousands of NGOs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Many Hands Lighten the Load'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.