Baha'is on Trial; America's Iran Policy Must Include Religious Freedom

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 19, 2010 | Go to article overview

Baha'is on Trial; America's Iran Policy Must Include Religious Freedom


Byline: S. Rob Sobhani, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Another round of scape -goating of Iran's Ba -ha'is by the theocratic regime started last week with a show trial of the seven men and women that make up the ad hoc coordinating body of the Iranian Baha'is - the country's largest religious minority. Charged with stirring up all the unrest sweeping the country today,Iran's 300,000 Baha'is find themselves in serious jeopardy.

As President Obama tries to tackle the troubling issue of America's relations with Iran, he should keep the prayer for America that has been officially enshrined in Baha'i prayer books as his moral compass:

Oh, God, let this American democracy become glorious in spiritual degrees and render this just government victorious. Confirm this revered nation to upraise the standard of the oneness of humanity, to promulgate the Most Great Peace, to become thereby most glorious and praiseworthy among all the nations of the world. Oh, God, this American nation is worthy of Thy favors and is deserving of Thy mercy.

The prayer itself was delivered in Chicago on April 30, 1912, by 'Abdu'l-Baha, the son of the prophet-founder of the Baha'i faith, Baha'u'llah, who was visiting the United States at the behest of the nascent Baha'i community in America. Since then, the Baha'i community has been able to flourish in America because of the protections granted by our Constitution.

The opposite has been true in Iran, the birthplace of the Baha'i faith. Baha'is in Iran have been subject to harassment, torture and execution from the faith's inception in the mid-1800s. Muslim clerics in Iran have always felt threatened by the core principles of the Baha'i faith, principles that are in many respects similar to America's core spiritual and social values: the abandonment of all forms of prejudice, the elimination of the extremes of wealth and poverty, universal education and gender equality, among others.

According to the State Department, these seven men and women are in immediate danger. Detained last spring on baseless charges of espionage for Israel, insulting religious sanctities, and propaganda against the Islamic republic, they face trials with a pre-ordained ending. Despite lack of evidence to back up the charges, these individuals have been refused access to their legal counsel, Nobel laureate Shirin Ebadi, who, likewise, has been denied access to their files, and has been harassed, intimidated and threatened since taking their case.

But the Baha'is are not the only ones facing persecution in Iran. Since the establishment of the Islamic republic, the regime has acted as an equal-opportunity persecutor, arresting and violating the basic rights of Christians, Jews, Sunni Muslims, ethnic minorities, students, human rights activists and journalists, to name a few. …

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