Assessment of Teenage Diaries for Teaching Concepts in Adolescent Psychology

By McKee, Meredith L.; MacDonald, Pamelyn M. | Journal of Instructional Psychology, December 2009 | Go to article overview

Assessment of Teenage Diaries for Teaching Concepts in Adolescent Psychology


McKee, Meredith L., MacDonald, Pamelyn M., Journal of Instructional Psychology


Student self-report measures have been reported in numerous studies to assert that the use of ease studies in college psychology courses can help students to better understand the relevance of course topics; however, few studies have directly measured the impact of case studies on students' learning. The present study differs from previous studies involving case studies in that a pretest-posttest design with within-test control items was utilized to investigate the effectiveness of four National Public Radio's Teenage Diaries used to facilitate students' (N=35) learning and retention of course concepts in an adolescent psychology course. The present study also sought to determine if other educational variables, such as prior coursework in psychology and reading ability, had any influence on students' test scores. The statistically significant results indicated that the use of the diaries was an effective instructional intervention, and that reading ability in part plays a role in students' academic achievement.

***********

The application of case studies have long been used by psychology instructors to illustrate course material and to increase students' appreciation of the relevance of course concepts outside of the classroom context. The research involving the use of case studies has suggested that increased understanding of course material is perceived by college students (e.g., Cabe, Walker, & Williams, 1999; McDade, 1995; Sheldon, 2000, 2004; Tsui, 2002). To date, however, few studies have directly examined the impact of case studies on students' actual learning of course concepts. According to Tsui (2002), studies that have addressed classroom experiences tend to rely too heavily on student self-report data rather than observational data. Also, among the research that has examined the use of case studies to promote students' understanding of course material, the focus of teaching varies, thus studies addressing the same teaching elements have produced varied findings. Given that the use of case studies in college courses is an increasingly popular activity to enhance course materials, educators need to determine if these activities really do help students to learn about course concepts.

Sheldon (2004) described a single case study assignment using the National Public Radio's Teenage Diaries series (Richman & Radio Diaries Inc., 2000) to facilitate college students' understanding of concepts in an adolescent psychology course. Consistent with past studies, Sheldon (2004) reported high levels of student self-reported satisfaction with the presentation and relevance of the diary; however, it was not determined if the use of the diary actually had an effect on students' course performance. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to further investigate Sheldon's (2004) findings, and to replicate the research to the extent that college students listened to Teenage Diaries in conjunction with the presentation of course content and end-course self-report student satisfaction data were obtained. This study is different from the Sheldon (2004) study in that a pretest-posttest design with within-test control items was used to determine if exposure to four Teenage Diaries had any direct effect on the students' learning. This study also examined how aspects of the students' educational experiences, such as previous coursework in psychology and reading ability, interacted with the measures.

Method

Participants

College students (N=35) enrolled in an undergraduate Adolescent Psychology course consented to participate. There were 28 (80%) females and 7 (20%) males. The participants self-reported if they had previously taken any courses in psychology either in high school or college. Of the 35 participants, 19 (54.29%) indicated they had previous introductory-level coursework in psychology, while 16 (45.71%) indicated they had none. In addition, 3 (8.6%) of the participants who indicated they had previous introductory coursework also indicated they had taken a course in developmental (infant and/or child) psychology. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Assessment of Teenage Diaries for Teaching Concepts in Adolescent Psychology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.