The More Stories They Hear, the Less People Will Have Fear and Hate; WEDNESDAY Is Holocaust Memorial Day When the Atrocities Committed by the Nazis during the Second World War Are Remembered. JOANNE BUTCHER Talks to One Survivor about Her Painful Memories

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), January 23, 2010 | Go to article overview

The More Stories They Hear, the Less People Will Have Fear and Hate; WEDNESDAY Is Holocaust Memorial Day When the Atrocities Committed by the Nazis during the Second World War Are Remembered. JOANNE BUTCHER Talks to One Survivor about Her Painful Memories


Byline: JOANNE BUTCHER

AT four-years-old, Ruth Barnett (nee Michaelis) was ripped from her family and sent hundreds of miles across Europe.

The year was 1939, and the little girl, alongside her sevenyear-old brother, travelled from Berlin to London on the Kindertransport, the rescue mission for Jewish children.

It was her family's last resort to keep her safe from the Nazis.

On Wednesday, Holocaust Memorial Day, Ruth will share her incredible story with 150 students at Consett Community Sports College.

She says it is vital to talk about what happened and teach youngsters to think about the lessons of the Holocaust.

"It is enormously important to talk about what happened, and to have a dialogue," said Ruth, now 75 and living in London.

"I tell people they can ask me any question, although I may not have the answer to all of them.

"I hope that by listening to my personal story they will be interested in hearing other stories. The more stories they hear, the less they will fear and hate have."

Ruth was born in 1935 to a Jewish father and non-Jewish mother. When Hitler took power, her dad fled to Shanghai and her mother was forced into hiding for taking part in a protest in Berlin.

After travelling to safety in England, Ruth and her brother lived with three foster families and in a hostel.

In 1949, she was forced to move back to Germany by her father. She found this traumatic as it meant once again leaving the security of a home and country she was used to, and she returned to England just a few months later. …

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The More Stories They Hear, the Less People Will Have Fear and Hate; WEDNESDAY Is Holocaust Memorial Day When the Atrocities Committed by the Nazis during the Second World War Are Remembered. JOANNE BUTCHER Talks to One Survivor about Her Painful Memories
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