Cultivating the City's Ambitious Minds; Business Education Isn't about Building Rafts, but Building Knowledge

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), January 26, 2010 | Go to article overview

Cultivating the City's Ambitious Minds; Business Education Isn't about Building Rafts, but Building Knowledge


A BUSINESS education company is adding to Liverpool's growing reputation as a city building a solid base for its future prosperity in the knowledge economy.

Ambitious Minds, which was established last year, was set up by three specialists in financial and business education.

Sean McGuire, Ian Cornelius and Andrew Berkley were senior managers with global education provider Kaplan before leaving to start their own business.

They launched Ambitious Minds to focus their skills and experience in bespoke financial and business education and to work with companies and organisations who themselves are serious and committed to the continuing training and education of their people.

Sean McGuire has spent much of his career with some of the biggest players in the UK and US business training market.

He was the managing director of Financial Training Company's financial markets business and, until last summer, he was the head of corporate training at Kaplan, where he was responsible for the development and delivery of key strategic training programmes to multinationals, magic circle law firms, accountancy firms as well as local and central government.

He said: "We don't teach people how to build rafts - instead, we design programmes with their business in mind.

"We develop and deliver in-house training programmes, in all aspects of finance and business, which are carefully tailored to meet the real needs of our clients whether their needs are for new skills, improved knowledge or better commercial understanding.

"We always define the specific business context in which those needs sit."

Ian Cornelius, a chartered accountant and physics graduate, is the author of two books on the creation of shareholder value. …

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