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Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England), January 30, 2010 | Go to article overview

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Here are some of the many comments that have been made on Sarah's Facebook campaign.

Michael Snaith: "My five-year-old daughter asked the question on Sunday 'If they build the school on the overflow car park at Preston Park where will people park their cars when its busy?' "If a five-year-old understands the concept surely the council must, or will they just be shocked... a child actually has or is allowed to have an opinion, she''ll be devastated if she realises how this could completely destroy the current fabric of the park as she knows it."

Andrew Austin: "It won't be 'Egglescliffe school' but Preston school. Will a park be built over the old school site? No - it will be sold off for development like everywhere else in Egglescliffe."

Sarah Heptinstall: "How ridiculous...

it's a park, a hall with lovely grounds and one of the only decent parks in the area.. why the hell would you put a school on it?! What about all the events they hold there etc..? I've never heard such rubbish."

Carole Ann Moore: "Why can't they build a school in Ingleby Toytown for the pupils there? Or maybe the developers (my favourite people) have got a stranglehold on the place - all that prime land ready to make a fortune for a lucky few. There used to be the site of the most northerly Roman villa in Ingleby - surely an important historical site - but they built houses on it."

Lee Mansell: "I moved from Eaglescliffe to Ingleby and one of my kids goes to Egglescliffe school I think that the school should stay in the Eaglescliffe area."

Here are a selection of your comments taken from our website - gazettelive.co.uk agpie1 wrote: "I do not see why Egglescliffe School should not be built on its present site but sympathise with IBIS councillors as Ingleby Barwick should have its own school and is at least twenty years overdue. …

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