Abbott's Climate Policy 'Too Late'

The Northern Star (Lismore, Australia), February 4, 2010 | Go to article overview

Abbott's Climate Policy 'Too Late'


TONY ABBOTT'S environmental plans are too little, too late - after the horse has bolted.

While they have merit as part of a serious attempt to repair the environment, I shudder to think what the Leader of the Opposition might do with our wetland areas (those still viable) and anything that stands in the way of so-called 'progress'.

It's ridiculous that we continue to grow cotton and rice in one of the driest continents on the planet but nothing can stand in the way of production, apparently.

Also, one wonders if the Federal Government has factored in contingencies which include protection of our wildlife and increasingly endangered species in their grand population plan.

I can only hope so in this uncertain world.

Climate change

CAN you believe that I wasn't aware of the internationally funded conspiracy to 'prove' anthropogenic global warming until G.Macdonald informed me (NS 15/1/10)?

I've been hoodwinked!

These people are probably the same dirty rats who took pictures of men supposedly walking on the moon in a California film studio, who faked Elvis's death, who pretend that cigarettes cause lung cancer and who say the Tooth Fairy and Santa are not real.

These people sure play dirty.

Getting back to reality, I will comment on a couple of other issues Mr G. Macdonald raised.

Many of the climate change deniers make a big thing of the period from roughly AD800 to 1300, when temperatures may have been slightly warmer than at present, at least in northern Europe.

But this information is irrelevant because the effect was regional, not global, and because it was tiny by comparison with expected climate change.

The 'Medieval Climate Anomaly' as it is called, though probably warmer than the Little Ice Age that followed, was probably slightly cooler than the last 30 years. Big woop.

No one claims that climate models are perfect, but the ultimate test is whether they predict real life events, and some of the models discussed by the IPCC have been able to anticipate effects such as the global cooling effects resulting from major volcanic eruptions like Mt Pinatubo in the Philippines in 1991, as well as recent ice melts in Arctic areas.

The claim that present climate changes are not outside the bounds of natural climatic variability has some truth, but it is mostly irrelevant to explaining current climate change.

Most of the known 'natural' variability in the past was before the

development of human civilisations.

There has been no global temperature increase of 5 degrees C (which would be accompanied by much larger regional increases) in a single century over the past 50 million years. …

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