Cohabitation Rises for Seniors

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 9, 2010 | Go to article overview

Cohabitation Rises for Seniors


Byline: Cheryl Wetzstein, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

When the topic of cohabiting comes up, it's usually associated with the young and the restless. But another segment of the population is increasingly sharing a bedroom while skipping the wedding vows: senior citizens.

As with many trends, it remains to be seen if senior cohabiting is beneficial, benign or benighted.

A paper by Susan L. Brown and Sayaka Kawamura at the Center for Family and Demographic Research at Bowling Green State University sheds some light on this understudied issue.

The issue is important, they write, because the U.S. population is aging, and older adults are less likely to be married now and in the future than in the past.

Also, cohabitation is accelerating among older adults, they say. Census data show that between 2000 and 2008, the number of cohabiting persons aged 50 and older almost doubled, from 1.2 million to 2.2 million.

Before anyone asks the So what? question, let's restate the merits of marriage, as they hold for elderly couples just as powerfully as they do for younger ones.

Married seniors typically enjoy higher levels of physical and mental health and greater financial resources and social support than unmarried seniors, Ms. Brown and Ms. Kawamura write in their paper, Relationship Quality Among Cohabitors and Marrieds in Older Adulthood.

Research already shows that married people generally fare better than cohabiters, but almost all the studies focus on young couples. What about the seniors?

Ms. Brown and Ms. Kawamura tried to answer that question through data from the 2005-2006 National Social, Life, Health and Aging Project, a sample of 3,005 persons aged 57 to 85.

They found that cohabiting seniors are as content as married seniors when it comes to emotional satisfaction, communication, physical pleasure and time spent together. But they also found four significant differences.

Senior cohabiters are less likely to live with a partner who makes too many demands on them: Just 23 percent of cohabiters say they live with a nag, compared to 38 percent of married seniors. …

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