Japan Doesn't Get It

By Baker, Katie | Newsweek International, February 15, 2010 | Go to article overview

Japan Doesn't Get It


Baker, Katie, Newsweek International


Byline: Katie Baker

One of the most striking turns in the fall of Toyota is how the recall scandal is playing with much of the Japanese public: as a bewildering American frenzy. Yes, they are concerned about the recall, but many assume Americans must have some malign reason for kicking up a fuss, when in fact recalls happen all the time. Some read the recommendation from U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood to Toyota drivers--"stop driving them"--as proof of a Japan-bashing Washington conspiracy. They are quick to point out that the faulty brake pedals were actually made in Indiana, not Japan. And until very recently, at least, they seemed convinced that the frenzy would fade away without lasting damage to Japan. Look at BMW: its 2008 recall of 200,000 cars for possible airbag failure left no marks on Germany's engineering reputation.

Note to Japan: you don't get it. Recalls for minor technical problems are common, but recalls of millions of vehicles for problems that can produce nightmarish, fatal crashes are not. Toyota's recall of 6.6 million cars is the sixth largest in U.S. history so far, and one of the scariest. Most automakers have learned to handle these PR disasters forthrightly, but Toyota CEO Akio Toyoda performed a duck-and-denial routine not seen since Ford tried to evade responsibility for exploding Pintos in the 1970s before he belatedly apologized last week. …

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