CVD May Be Linked to Depression in Lupus

By Zoler, Mitchel L. | Clinical Psychiatry News, January 2010 | Go to article overview

CVD May Be Linked to Depression in Lupus


Zoler, Mitchel L., Clinical Psychiatry News


Philadelphia patients with lupus have a high prevalence of depression, which may be linked to the cardiovascular disease that's also highly prevalent in lupus patients.

Cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk "may precipitate development of depression in patients with lupus," Laura Julian, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology. It's also possible that depression in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) exacerbates cardiovascular disease by making patients poorly compliant with treatment. "The relationship between cardiovascular disease and depression [in lupus patients] may be bidirectional," she said.

Because of this apparent interrelationship, physicians who care for SLE patients should regularly screen them for depression and treat it when diagnosed. Physicians should also be diligent about screening for and treating cardiovascular disease risks in lupus patients, said Dr. Julian, a neuropsychologist at the University of California, San Francisco.

"Our working hypothesis is that accumulation of vascular disease in specific white-matter regions of the brain might precipitate development of depression. In lupus patients there is a very high risk of cardiovascular outcomes, so we think this is reasonable," she said in an interview. This etiology has been called vascular depression.

Evidence supporting the occurrence of vascular depression in SLE patients came from following patients who were enrolled in the Lupus Outcomes Study, which enrolled patients with SLE at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Julian and her associates collected data from 725 lupus patients who were followed for more than 5 years. More than 90% of the patients were women, and average age at entry to the study was 51.

At entry and regularly during follow-up, the patients were assessed for depression by having them complete the CES-D (Center for Epidemiology Studies-Depression) scale, a commonly used, self-report, 20-question survey. People who scored 23 or higher on the CES-D were considered to have probable depression. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

CVD May Be Linked to Depression in Lupus
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.