Lorna Valdez on Cooking Up a Business: Lorwill's BBQ Stand

By Santos, Annette Taijeron; Dacanay, Jennifer | Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies, December 15, 2009 | Go to article overview

Lorna Valdez on Cooking Up a Business: Lorwill's BBQ Stand


Santos, Annette Taijeron, Dacanay, Jennifer, Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies


CASE DESCRIPTION

The search for opportunity is the entrepreneur's roller coaster. According to the SBA Office of Advocacy's annual report (Source: http://www.sba.gov/advo/), there are approximately 25.85 million small businesses in America. The economy and financial markets generally support the growth of small business. Many scholars estimate that 75% of the businesses formed will last less than five years. Approximately 19.86 million of these small businesses were sole proprietorships, which continue to rise according to an analysis of the Census Bureau data found in the SCORE website (Source: http://www.score.org/small_biz_stats.html). Between 1997 and 2002, women-owned businesses increased 19.8 percent or 6.5 million businesses. More than 14 percent of women-owned firms employed 7.1 million workers accounting for $173.7 billion in annual payroll in 2002.

CASE SYNOPSIS

This is the first record of the business history and entrepreneurship of Lorna Valdez placed in context. Also included is the history on the family and how it all started, a business she built from scratch and that continues to grow today--Lorwill's BBQ Stand. Also included is the economic analysis of each of her business ventures throughout her entrepreneurial venture until today. The current business is one that is in the growth stage, having opened for only three years and is continuing to expand.

As a small firm in a price-taking market, her managerial decisions are what created the competitive edge. In Guam, where there is high competition as well as demand for food and especially barbeque (a local favorite andpast time) she is able to offer the market something unique. This and other factors that lead to relatively higher market power for her business than other vendors in the Dededo area explain how its success has grown.

BEGINNINGS

In 1993, Lorna Valdez was working as a waitress at Chopsteak, a restaurant located in Tumon, Guam. After working there for just over a year, she was promoted to the position of manager with an $8 hour pay. In 1994, the restaurant was forced to close down for the construction of what is now Planet Hollywood. Her boyfriend, at the time, gave her the idea that they should open up a hamburger stand. The idea of opening up her own business and being her own boss strongly appealed to her. She also wanted to find a way to make more money. This was a defining experience for Lorna Valdez. She learned that she had a talent--she was good at cooking and enjoyed it.

HISTORY

The first business she attempted was a hamburger stand located in Tumon, where the Slingshot is now located. The food sold at the stand was mainly a variety of American-style hamburgers. The opportunity cost of opening up the food stand is the lost cost ranging between $1,200 to $1,500 working as a manager. The cost to rent out the space was $500 a month and Lorna Valdez soon recognized that daily revenue was not enough to cover personal bills and expenses. Several months after opening, she realized that the business was not making enough.

Although her first attempt was not as successful as she had hoped, she continued to follow her newfound talent in cooking. Thereafter, she endeavored on another method of selling food, which was delivering homemade food. She would prepare food at home, package it, and then deliver to various locations to sell. The food would be prepared three times a day, six times a week. Her market was limited to stores such as Napa Auto, Diamond Auto, National Office Supply, and various taxi companies located in Tumon.

She delivered food this way beginning October 1995 and continued for about a year. Her daily menu included mainly Filipino dishes such as fried lumpia, okoy, pancit, spaghetti, and food plates that included rice with choices such as calderetta, sinigang, and/or adobo. She also sold two soups that changed daily; varying from arroz caldo con goto, corn soup, arroz caldo, and other ethnic varieties. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Lorna Valdez on Cooking Up a Business: Lorwill's BBQ Stand
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.