National Flight Academy to Prepare Youth for STEM Careers

By Ragsdale, Shelley | National Defense, February 2010 | Go to article overview

National Flight Academy to Prepare Youth for STEM Careers


Ragsdale, Shelley, National Defense


Using a 9,000-square-foot facility called the Flight Adventure Deck at the National Naval Aviation Museum in Pen-sacola, Fla., more than 50,000 students during the past 10 years have seen firsthand, how their classroom science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) theory has a real-time, hands-on application in aviation.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The Flight Adventure Deck is an interactive introduction to the field. A collaborative effort between the museum and two local school districts, it was outfitted at a cost of $2 million.

The simulator includes 38 interactive devices, 11 educational kiosks, an interactive wind tunnel and four computer-based flight simulators for middle-school students.

The program has recently expanded to include high school level navigational and meteorology curricula. Results from pre-and post-testing of students who have participated in the program show a 40 percent increase in science and math subject matter knowledge.

The flight deck, however, is just the first step. Construction of the National Flight Academy started in June. Located adjacent to the museum, the National Flight Academy will be housed in a 100,000-square-foot state-of-the-art facility. During a five-and-a-half day in-residence program, students will be challenged through team-based competitions and fully engaged through advanced serious gaming and simulation engineering. The aim is to show them how far their potential extends.

Building upon the success of the Flight Adventure Deck, the National Flight Academy will take an immersive, and wholly hands-on approach to teaching the principles of science and engineering while reaching beyond the traditional academic experience.

A dynamic curriculum designed for grades seven through 12 will challenge students from around the world in an aviation-based environment. The lessons will be centered on five core competencies: navigation; meteorology; aerodynamics; propulsion; and flight physiology. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

National Flight Academy to Prepare Youth for STEM Careers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.