Greece Is Far from the EU's Only Joker

By Theil, Stefan | Newsweek, March 1, 2010 | Go to article overview

Greece Is Far from the EU's Only Joker


Theil, Stefan, Newsweek


Byline: Stefan Theil

First there was Enron; then, subprime. Now it turns out that some governments have been just as adept at using financial alchemy to hide debts. Take Greece, a country with a $350 billion national debt that is now under investigation by the European Commission (EC) for underreporting its deficit by as much as 9 percent of GDP in 2009. It used derivatives devised by Goldman Sachs to give itself an off-the-book loan, sold future EU subsidies and lottery earnings to investment banks for upfront cash, and raised money by mortgaging its highways and airports.

But even as Europe's leaders unleashed their fury at the Greeks--and at the bankers who aided and abetted them--it turns out there is hardly any government that isn't guilty of these kinds of tricks, according to OECD and EU officials. Italy has a similarly longhistory of using derivatives and creative accounting to artificially reduce its deficits. Belgium and Portugal have raised cash by selling future tax receipts. Last fall Germany tried to shift up to $60 billion of spending on public health care and jobless benefits into a special-purpose vehicle so it wouldn't show up in the 2010 deficit--before caving to media outrage. Another widespread gimmick is the "public-private partnership," which shifts current outlays to private investors in return for future payments that often don't show up as liabilities. Britain, where this kind of scheme first flourished (prodded along by the London banks), has since moved some of the $80 billion in such deals back on the books, but most remain off-budget. …

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