DAR Chapter Recognizes Essay Award Winners Fifth Grade Seventh Grade Eighth Grade Achievement

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 24, 2010 | Go to article overview

DAR Chapter Recognizes Essay Award Winners Fifth Grade Seventh Grade Eighth Grade Achievement


Every year, the Signal Hill Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution hosts an American History essay contest for students in fifth through eighth grades from Barrington and surrounding area schools.

This year's topic was "The Transcontinental Railroad," inviting students to write about that moment May 10, 1869, when the golden spike was driven at Promontory Summit, Utah.

Students could write from the perspective of a settler planning to use the railroad, an Irish or Chinese railroad worker, or a Native American whose way of life was affected by the railroad.

Eighty-three students representing three area schools (Grove Avenue School, Barrington; Fox River Country Day School, Elgin; and Elgin Academy, Elgin) participated. The essays were judged on several components, including historical accuracy, originality, spelling and grammar, and bibliography.

First place winners are automatically entered into the Illinois District IV competition, with an opportunity to move on to the Illinois State competition followed by the U.S. Division competition and ultimately the National competition in Washington, D.C.

The following students were named winners:

Co-first place: Kyle Pritchett, Grove Avenue School, and Sebastian d'Huc, Grove Avenue School

Second place: Wesley Gizel, Grove Avenue School

Third place: Chloe Layton, Grove Avenue School

Co-fourth place: Kelsey Ragnini, Grove Avenue School; Vivian Xu, Grove Avenue School; Anthony Zhou, Grove Avenue School

Honorable mention awards were presented to Kelsey Barnick, Grove Avenue School; Brock Calamari, Grove Avenue School; Margot Dick, Grove Avenue School; Siddharth Gehlaut, Grove Avenue School; Caleb Orr, Grove Avenue School; Akshara Ramakrishnan, Grove Avenue School; Alexandra Skopek, Grove Avenue School; Annie Smith, Grove Avenue School; Lily Zheng, Grove Avenue School

Sixth grade

First place: Nicholas High, Fox River Country Day School

Second place: Russell Bergeron, Fox River Country Day

Third place: Brenna Wall, Fox River Country Day School

Co-fourth place: Jacob Clapp, Fox River Country Day School; Benjamin Prigge, Fox River Country Day; Elena Silva, Fox River Country Day School; Melissa Trudrung, Fox River Country Day

Honorable mention went to Patrick Geenen, Fox River Country Day School; Olivia Halik, Fox River Country Day School; Maxine Scotty, Fox River Country Day School; Gabriela Sotomayor, Fox River Country Day School; Joseph Sullivan, Fox River Country Day School

Co-first place: Derrick Martinez, Fox River Country Day, and John Petropoulos, Fox River Country Day

Second place: Colin Perry, Fox River Country Day School

Co-third place: Shannon Carlson, Fox River Country Day, and Hannah Demel, Fox River Country Day

Fourth place: Samuel Ray, Fox River Country Day School

Honorable mention went to: Danna Goodman, Fox River Country Day School; Jun Kwon, Fox River Country Day School; Ji-young Lee, Fox River Country Day School; Janiece Levinson, Fox River Country Day School; Loretta Stelnicki, Fox River Country Day School; Steven Van Durme, Fox River Country Day School

First place: Sofia B. …

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