Editor's Page

By Geruschat, Duane R. | Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, February 2010 | Go to article overview

Editor's Page


Geruschat, Duane R., Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness


The chance to attend a conference allows us to develop as professionals and provides us an opportunity to stay current with new technologies, teaching strategies, and important issues within the field. Perhaps there is an annual state or regional conference or a biennial national conference that you usually attend. The conferences most commonly attended by readers of the journal are likely to be the regional orientation and mobility (O&M) conferences of the Southeastern O&M Association, Central Atlantic O&M Association, and the California Association of O&M Instructors; the conference of the Council for Exceptional Children; and the regional and national conferences of the Association for Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired. During the past few years, I have started to venture out to other conferences and found that, after 20-plus years of always attending the same events, it was quite interesting and stimulating to attend new ones. Some of the gatherings I have visited over the past year include the International Mobility Conference, the International Low Vision Conference, and Envision. Each of these meetings took me out of my comfort zone in terms of the number of people I knew (very few) and the topics that were presented. I have come to recognize that although it is positive to develop and maintain contact with a group of colleagues over the years, it is also incredibly stimulating to attend new conferences, meet new people, and hear new ideas. I encourage you to consider being a "first-time" attendee at a conference you have never attended before. I can assure you, the experience will be highly educational and stimulating.

In the same way that attending a symposium for the first time may offer unique information from a different point of view, this February issue of the Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness (JVIB) offers research and commentary on fascinating topics that I, for one, do not think about on a daily basis. …

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