Pro-Life Leaders Note Shift against Abortion

The New American, February 15, 2010 | Go to article overview

Pro-Life Leaders Note Shift against Abortion


Hundreds of thousands of participants flooded the nation's capital January 22 to pray for an end to abortion and remember the 50 million babies lost in the 37 years since the U.S. Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision.

One estimate placed the size of the march in Washington, D.C., at close to 250,000. Charmaine Yoest, president and CEO of Americans United for Life, said the turnout demonstrated the momentum the pro-life movement has to end abortion. "It' s really important for our Congressmen and our Senators to know that the pro-life movement is out here and energized," she said.

According to Cybercast News Service, U.S. Representative Chris Smith (R-N.J.), who spoke at the event, told the crowd that there has been "almost a schizophrenic view when it comes to regarding the unborn child as expendable" compared to the manner in which the nation has come to the aid of those suffering and hurting in Haiti in the aftermath of the devastating earthquake. "We have greatly and--thankfully--passionately stepped up to the plate to help people who are suffering from catastrophes like the Haitian earthquake," he said, but added that "our hearts should go out in a like manner to the unborn and to the wounded mothers from abortion."

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A recent poll conducted by the Marist Institute for Public Opinion indicates that there has been a definite shift toward a pro-life perspective among Americans. …

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