Ban Bankers' Payouts; Your Letters

The Mirror (London, England), March 3, 2010 | Go to article overview

Ban Bankers' Payouts; Your Letters


Byline: FIONA PARKER

I ALWAYS thought bankers were good with figures and managing money but it seems that's pie in the sky - unless they're the beneficiaries.

How on earth can the Government allow Lloyds, which was given pounds 20billion of taxpayers' money, to hand out pounds 200million in bonuses to staff after it announced losses of pounds 6.3bn (Mirror, February 27)? Its bosses are using the outdated excuse that, without bonuses, their best people will quit.

But if losing over pounds 6bn is the best their best people can do, what would their losses be under poor staff.

We have gone overboard with assistance to banks and now they are slapping us in the face.

It's no wonder union leaders are up-in-arms about wages and thousands out of work when they read banks are rewarding staff for almost bringing the country to its knees.

Tom Baxter, Denny, Stirlingshire

HOW can Royal Bank of Scotland justify paying pounds 1.3billion in bonuses when last year it made a loss of more than pounds 3bn? The City excuses it by saying that if they didn't pay bonuses, bankers would seek employment elsewhere.

Let them go. Don't they realise they wouldn't have a job if it weren't for taxpayers bailing them out? No bonuses should be paid until they are back in profit but the bottom line is that you have to blame the Government for allowing all this.

D Dunbar, Hall Green, Lancs

THE banks are holding back on mortgages and not lending to businesses.

At the same time they're still making billions in profit and paying immoral amounts in bonuses.

The reality is they are friends of the Tories and don't want the economy to recover before the election. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ban Bankers' Payouts; Your Letters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.