Winning $50 Bill for the Gipper; Reagan's Face on Cash Is Goal of Lawmaker

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 4, 2010 | Go to article overview

Winning $50 Bill for the Gipper; Reagan's Face on Cash Is Goal of Lawmaker


Byline: Jennifer Harper, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Former President Ronald Reagan could achieve a newfound currency: his face emblazoned on a crisp $50 bill. The Gipper could supplant Grant.

That is the intent of Rep. Patrick T. McHenry, who would like to replace the face of Ulysses S. Grant with Reagan's image on that particular greenback. The North Carolina Republican introduced legislation to that effect on Tuesday.

Every generation needs its own heroes, Mr. McHenry said. One decade into the 21st century, it's time to honor the last great president of the 20th and give President Reagan a place beside Presidents Roosevelt and Kennedy.

The latter two are emblazoned on the dime and half dollar, respectively.

President Reagan was a modern day statesman, whose presidency transformed our nation's political and economic thinking, Mr. McHenry continued. Through both his domestic and international policies he renewed America's self confidence, defeated the Soviets and taught us that each generation must provide opportunity for the next.

America's 40th president hasn't lost popularity with the public either. Harris polls and other opinion trackers have consistently placed Reagan in the nation's top-10 favorite presidents. In this year's annual historical presidential poll, Reagan was in second place, only outranked by Abraham Lincoln, Harris found.

Mr. McHenry cited a 2005 Wall Street Journal survey that ranked Reagan sixth on the White House hit parade - and Grant in the 29th spot.

Meanwhile, there are currently two efforts afoot to name a mountain after Reagan before Feb. …

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