Helping Our Engineers

Manila Bulletin, March 7, 2010 | Go to article overview

Helping Our Engineers


Our era is defined by innovation. So competitive is the world we live in now that the ability to produce scientific and technological breakthroughs determines a country’s success or failure.At the core of this massive drive to innovate are scientists and engineers who have the ability to apply technical, scientific, and mathematical knowledge to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes.Engineering is one of the broadest fields of study in the applied sciences, and its system of accreditation is rigorous and diverse. Currently, there are four different accrediting associations in the world.One of the hurdles our engineers face in applying to international registers like the APEC Register and the International Professional Engineers’ Register is the two years short in our basic education. We do not qualify for membership in engineering bodies, disadvantaging our engineers from their Western and other Asian counterparts.For the last two years the Congressional Commission on Science, Technology and Engineering (COMSTE), which I chair, has been pushing to have the Philippines become an accredited member of the Washington Accord. This accord is an agreement between nations that recognizes the equivalence of engineering programs, and therefore allows our Filipino engineers to practice as professionals in other member countries.Without membership in this exclusive group, our engineers are at a disadvantage as their education is deemed not up to par with international standards. …

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