REASSURANCE ON OUR CITY STREETS; New Officers Will Help Tackle Yob Culture

South Wales Echo (Cardiff, Wales), March 12, 2010 | Go to article overview

REASSURANCE ON OUR CITY STREETS; New Officers Will Help Tackle Yob Culture


Byline: Abby Alford

ANTI-SOCIAL behaviour and crimes that blight communities will be tackled by six new neighbourhood management officers.

They have been tasked with helping the police and Cardiff council crack down on everything from doorstep crime to dog fouling in the capital.

The men and women will identify issues affecting residents and liaise with partnership organisations that include the fire service, health board and the Assembly Government's Communities First programme to solve the problem and improve their quality of life.

The pilot scheme is funded by the council and run under the banner of the Home Office-backed Safer Capital community safety partnership. The officers have been told to walk the streets of their communities alongside PCSOs, and have been given free bus passes by Cardiff Bus so they can provide visible reassurance to passengers.

But they have no powers to compel the public to comply with the law.

The man responsible for policing in Cardiff, Chief Superintendent Josh Jones, who also jointly chairs Safer Capital, said: "Crime in South Wales is at a 20-year low and crime in Cardiff is reducing at a significantly faster rate than the national average.

"However, we recognise that people don't always feel safe. Neighbourhood management is there to address this."

Councillor Judith Woodman, joint chairman of Safer Capital, said public service providers have been trying to serve communities without fully taking into account what they want. "Neighbourhood management has enabled organisations to reconsider the way they work, not only with each other but also with the communities they serve," she said.

But the scheme has attracted criticism from a politician, the Police Federation and the TaxPayers' Alliance who claim it is replicating the job already done by elected councillors, paid council enforcement officers, PCSOs and the police.

"My initial thought is that it sounds like a shocking waste of money," Conservative Cardiff North AM Jonathan Morgan told the Echo. "It is vital for local authorities to start behaving responsibly with public money."

Cardiff council has implemented a pounds 14m savings plan as public finances are squeezed. It plans to cut 300 jobs, reduce the opening hours of some leisure centres and implement a major shake-up of the city's waste and street cleaning teams.

The six neighbourhood management officers will earn pounds 19,126 to pounds 23,708 a year.

Wayne Baker, secretary of the Police Federation branch in South Wales, said they could help save police time by dealing with complaints about dog fouling and fly-tipping that are raised at Pact meetings.

He said police officers see their presence as "positive".

But he added their use as a visible presence on the streets was part of a "Government ploy to try to cover the cracks in the woodwork by having people from disparate organisations trying to cover issues that should be dealt with by the police".

Matthew Elliott, chief executive of the TaxPayers' Alliance, said: "It's important to ensure that as we already have the police and PCSOs this is not just another layer of ineffective bureaucracy.

"Budgets across all departments are likely to face a squeeze so it's more important than ever that money is spent on front-line policing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

REASSURANCE ON OUR CITY STREETS; New Officers Will Help Tackle Yob Culture
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.