Adhere to the Rule of Law on Immigration Policy

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 24, 2010 | Go to article overview

Adhere to the Rule of Law on Immigration Policy


Byline: Rep. Lamar Smith, , SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

One of the most important conservative principles is the dedication to the rule of law - that ideal that a nation's laws are necessary for the protection and preservation of its citizens' freedoms. Perhaps nowhere is this conservative ideal more directly under attack than with regard to immigration policy in America.

The attack on the rule of law approaches from three fronts: by the Obama administration, which ignores its responsibility to enforce the nation's laws; by open-borders advocates who push for an all-out moratorium on the enforcement of the laws; and by both the administration and advocates who favor amnesty for millions of illegal immigrants through comprehensive immigration reform.

The great irony is that American freedoms and the rule of law are often the very reason that many illegal immigrants try to come here. They are literally running from nations historically characterized by an absence of the rule of law and toward the freedom that America offers. And while we can sympathize with their desire for freedom, we cannot allow them to break down the very institutions that make America free and a beacon to immigrants from around the world.

So how should conservatives deal with this three-headed monster? And how will our individual commitment to conservative values impact the broader future of conservatism in America?

First, we need to dispense with the false notion that enforcing immigration laws will somehow drive immigrant voters - including Hispanics - away from conservative candidates.

In fact, Hispanics, who make up the largest portion of legal immigrants to America, share many of our conservative values. According to a Pew/Kaiser poll, Hispanic voters are more conservative than non-Hispanics. More than whites, they disapprove of abortion, homosexuality and divorce. Hispanics - both native-born and legal immigrants - also share the fundamental values of patriotism, rule of law, freedom, family, support for small businesses and jobs, and education. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Adhere to the Rule of Law on Immigration Policy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.