When the Sons Took Up Arms

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 26, 2010 | Go to article overview

When the Sons Took Up Arms


Byline: Martin Rubin, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

It's not often that a reviewer gets to point out just how the apostrophe is placed in the book's title, but for those of us who love punctuation in its proper place, there is no denying that there is a special pleasure in doing so. At first glance, because of Sigmund Freud's special fame, it might be natural to assume that it is his war that is under discussion in these pages. But he was lucky enough to be born in 1856 and so be spared the duty to fight for his beloved native Austro-Hungarian Empire, although patriot that he was, he would doubtless have done so.

Already approaching 60 when World War I broke out, he was too old himself, but all three of his sons served in the Austrian military and it is they, along with some Freud grandchildren, whose varied service in both the 20th century's world wars is the subject of Freuds' War.

Its author, Helen Fry, an academic at London's University College, describes Martin, Oliver and Ernst Freud as fiercely patriotic and did not think twice about fighting for their country.

Ironically, she adds pointedly, less than 20 years later that would count for nothing when the Nazis annexed their country. Which is how Martin's only son, Walter, and Ernst's three sons, Lucian (the famous portraitist), Clement (a TV personality and later member of the House of Commons) and Stephan all came to serve in the British forces in World War II.

Ms. Fry paints a detailed portrait of these very different military experiences, ranging from those of an Austrian horse artillery officer complete with sword and dueling scars (not that these were very useful on the Russian or Italian Front) to a British Special Operations paratrooper dropped behind enemy lines (in Austria no less). In doing so, she not only takes us into unusual corners of global conflicts, but illuminates the odd effects that historical volte-faces can have on people's well-entrenched patriotism.

We learn from Freuds' War that Sigmund and his offspring were loyal citizens well-entrenched in the interwar Austrian Republic, although, like most of its citizens, they mourned the passing of the old monarchical empire. Ms. Fry tells us of a world within a world where almost everyone these children knew, at their secular school or in their neighborhood, was Jewish, although obviously their father's fame and his practice ranged further.

All this security vanished overnight, of course, when Adolf Hitler's 1938 Anschluss swallowed Austria into the noxious bosom of a Greater Germany, where Jews were not only pariahs, they were not even citizens.

We were driven out of Austria like mangy dogs, wrote reserve officer Martin Freud, who had spent 1914-1918 fighting for Germany's Central Powers followed by nine months in a British POW camp, and considered ourselves lucky to escape alive, ironically to Britain. (This nation welcomed Professor Freud and his descendants to London in 1938, but this did not spare Martin and his son Walter from being interned by the British as enemy aliens in 1940. …

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