Biology Student Teachers' Conceptual Frameworks regarding Biodiversity

By Dikmenli, Musa | Education, Spring 2010 | Go to article overview

Biology Student Teachers' Conceptual Frameworks regarding Biodiversity


Dikmenli, Musa, Education


Biodiversity, the variety and variability of living organisms and the ecological patterns of which they are a part, has received a great deal of attention worldwide since the Rio Earth Summit in 1992 (van Weelie & Wals, 2002). The reasons for this attention are the increase of human activities on biodiversity, rainforest destruction, habitat fragmentation, species extinction, water and air pollution, alteration of natural cycles and many other environmental problems. Biodiversity is affected also by global climate changes and its effect on the human population. The protection of biodiversity is defined as one of the basic roads leading to sustainability. However, a global threat to biodiversity increases daily. The dramatic decrease in biodiversity, one of the most serious results of the global environmental crisis, is accepted as one of the most basic issues of our times (Gayford, 2000).

Biodiversity generally includes three main factors, namely genetic diversity, species diversity, and ecosystem diversity. These factors are important parameters of sustainable development (Kassas, 2002). Biodiversity is a sign of a healthy environment. However, excessive and unsustainable use of biological or natural resources has caused significant damage to biodiversity and the situation has become a threat to human life. Respecting nature, improving the quality of life, and protecting the biodiversity of the planet are principles of a sustainable community. The dependence of humanity on biodiversity, now and in the future, is unavoidable, because the continuation of man's existence depends on ecosystem services for lodging, clothing, drugs, and food. With regard to sustainable development, in order for humanity to continue its existence, it is necessary to provide a sustainable use of biodiversity. Therefore, it is very important to raise individuals with an awareness of the necessity to protect biodiversity to conserve its global richness.

In educational terminology, biodiversity is an environmental and ecological buzz-word and an ill-defined or fuzzy concept (Dreyfus et al., 1999; Richardson & Hari, 2008; van Weelie & Wals, 2002). Furthermore, the lack of clarity regarding assumptions, ethics, possibilities, and limitations about the depletion of biodiversity is part of the problems of education (Gayford, 2000). For these reasons, biodiversity has become the focal point of educational research in recent times. However, little research is presently carried out on biology student teachers' conceptual frameworks regarding the aspects of biodiversity. The study of biology student teachers' conceptual frameworks is quite important from the perspective of the development of environmental education and scientific literacy.

Most research about biodiversity is generally focused on biodiversity education (Dreyfus et al., 1999; Gayford, 2000; Kassas, 2002; Lindemann-Matthies et al., 2009; van Weelie & Wals, 2002), loss of biodiversity (Kim & Byrne, 2006; Menzel & Bogeholz, 2009), educational programs (Lindemann-Matthies, 2002), and students' knowledge about biodiversity (Menzel & Bogeholz, 2009; Summers et al., 2001; Yorek et al., 2008). Summers et al. (2000; 2001) investigate the understanding of practicing primary school teachers, and secondary science trainees about four environmental issues (biodiversity, the carbon cycle, ozone, and global warming). Researchers define the well-understood and not understood scientific concepts about the said environmental issues. Results have shown that most participants agree on the necessity of biodiversity and its benefits on humanity. However, some incomplete concepts and misconceptions about biodiversity have been reported. Moreover, in these studies it has been indicated that good subject knowledge is necessary for the best teaching.

From the perspective of science education, the teaching of biodiversity in schools for students in the 11-18 age group is considered a controversial issue. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Biology Student Teachers' Conceptual Frameworks regarding Biodiversity
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.