Estimating Carbon Credits from Reforestation Key to Success of UN Program

Manila Bulletin, March 27, 2010 | Go to article overview

Estimating Carbon Credits from Reforestation Key to Success of UN Program


A system of estimating carbon credits from reforestation through satellite imagery is being considered by experts in light of the United Nation’s $22-$29-billion global reforestation program that should raise forest funds for poorer countries like the Philippines.The estimation of biomass maintained by forests will be pivotal to the viability of the UN program Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) whose funding mechanism is now being negotiated by nations as part of the global effort to reverse global warming.Reforestation is seen to be a major direction for reversing climate change since deforestation accounts for 20 percent of man-made greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. This is much more than GHG emission from the transport sector. Forests also store 25 percent of terrestrial carbon.The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Year Book (YB) 2010 indicated that the challenge of monitoring these forests will be a key to REDD’s success.“REDD assigns a monetary value to standing forests in developing countries and allows developed countries to offset their carbon dioxide emissions by reimbursing local landowners, including indigenous people for protecting the forests,” according to the UNEP-YB launched Tuesday at the UNEP Global Ministerial Environment Forum in Bali, Indonesia.It is estimated that global emissions of GHG gas should drop by up to 72 percent from 2015 if countries have to prevent predicted temperature rise of two degrees.“There are multiple reasons for countries to make a transition to a low carbon, resource efficient Green Economy of which climate change is a key one,” said UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner.Experts have indicated the possible use of the Carnegie Landsat Analysis System (CLAS)-Lite which can estimate how much carbon is contained in a forest. …

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Estimating Carbon Credits from Reforestation Key to Success of UN Program
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