Letters in the Editor's Mailbag

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), March 25, 2010 | Go to article overview

Letters in the Editor's Mailbag


Byline: The Register-Guard

Historic health care plan passes

Finally, after Social Security was enacted in 1935 by the Roosevelt administration and Medicare was enacted in 1965 by the Johnson administration, we have a national health care plan in 2010 by the Obama administration - for everyone, and not for just the privileged. After 13 months of intensive campaigning by the many Democrats in America, we have a national health care plan passed in Congress by a partisan Democratic majority, with no votes or support from the Republicans.

U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio from Oregon led a group of House Democrats in the final hour, before voting for the final bill, to overturn a long-standing precedent that did not distribute Medicare payments fairly to some states, including Oregon. Their yes votes were needed to gain a majority for passage with the 219-212 final vote. Without the leadership of our district representative in Congress, the national health care plan may not have passed. He deserves our thanks.

ANDY NORDAHL

Florence

A testament to official arrogance

The proposed $250,000 in taxpayers' money to rename Belt Line Road to honor the memory of Randy Pap is just a portion of what it's really going to cost the citizens of this state. The erosion of public trust and faith in our elected leaders to prioritize and spend our public money wisely will be reflected in votes against future tax measures that are desperately needed to fund new schools, roads and public safety positions.

It's ironic that an idea meant to honor someone's contributions to his community now will be seen by many as a testament to the arrogance and alienation of those in power who have lost touch with the needs of the people they promised to faithfully serve. There are so many other ways in which the governor could pay homage to Pap that would not increase the cynicism a large number of people already have toward their own government. Oregon deserves better.

BEN BONNER

Eugene

Plan needs a paranoia provision

I'm hoping that the health care bill will provide desperately needed treatment for the acute paranoia suffered by its opponents!

SHARLENE CURRY

Eugene

We're all bankrupt now

After the current occupant bribed enough Democratic congressional representatives (including our Rep. Peter DeFazio) into passing Pelosicare, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had this to say: "We are here now to bea... along with the Congresses that enacted Social Security, Medicare, Civil Rights Act, health care for all Americans, all of that on a par (sic)."

Brilliant. Social Security and Medicare are currently upside down by more than a $100 trillion. That's roughly $325,000 for each and every American citizen.

You're bankrupt. I'm bankrupt. The Milky Way galaxy is bankrupt. The U6 (real) unemployment rate is hovering at 17 percent. The economy is in the outhouse.

And Democrats are partying.

DON RICHEY

Eugene

A cause of happiness

Hallelujah!

Many of us are feeling a sunlike warmth after long, cold nights of icy darkness in what one of the founders of our republic called "public happiness" - happiness shared with fellow citizens. It may involve private feelings, but certainly in this case it is happiness for the common good of all our fellow citizens.

When Obama's presidency was hanging by a thin thread, by a tiny three-vote margin, the U.S. House of Representatives - led by Speaker Nancy Pelosi - did something no Congress has done for a century; it completed the circle that includes Social Security and Medicare and brought our country into the civilized world, where every other advanced country has national health care.

At the pit of our deepest economic recession - and in spite of enormous sums of money spent to defeat health care reform - this changes the political landscape. …

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