9 'Deadly Sins' for Cops

Manila Bulletin, April 2, 2010 | Go to article overview

9 'Deadly Sins' for Cops


If the Roman Catholic Church has Seven Deadly Sins to do away with, the Philippine National Police (PNP) has nine for this year's national and local elections.Director General Jesus Verzosa, PNP chief, said copies of the nine prohibited acts for all policemen to follow will be distributed in English and Filipino languages to all police units across the country starting next week.Verzosa said prohibited acts include:1. Forming organizations, associations, clubs or groups of persons for the purpose of soliciting votes or undertaking any campaign for or against a candidate;2. Holding of caucuses, conferences, meeting or rally for the purpose of soliciting votes or undertaking any campaign or propaganda for or against a candidate;3. Making speeches, announcements, or commentaries for or against the election of any candidate for public office; 4. Publishing or distributing campaign literature or materials designed to support or oppose the election of any candidate;5. Directly or indirectly soliciting votes, pledges, or support for or against a candidate; 6. Being a delegate to any political convention or member of any political committee or any officer of any political club, or other similar political organizations; 7. Making speeches or publications to draw political support in behalf of a particular party or candidate;8. Directly or indirectly soliciting or receiving contribution for political purposes, and;9. Becoming publicly identified with the success or failure of any candidate.Verzosa said the nine prohibited acts all boils down to the simple rule that the policemen should never engage in partisan politics for the sake of maintaining integrity of the PNP organization.“As public servants, PNP personnel are mandated to remain neutral in the conduct of national and local elections and concentrate instead on keeping peace in the polls,” said Verzosa.Verzosa said these prohibited acts constitute “electioneering,” adding that it violates the provision stipulated in the Civil Service Commission Circular which states that: “No officer or employee in the civil service including members of the Armed Forces, shall engage directly or indirectly in any partisan political activity except to vote nor shall he use his official authority or influence to coerce the political activity or any other person or body. …

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