Extremist Reaction

By Hosenball, Mark; Isikoff, Michael | Newsweek, April 12, 2010 | Go to article overview

Extremist Reaction


Hosenball, Mark, Isikoff, Michael, Newsweek


Byline: Mark Hosenball and Michael Isikoff

Even in a subculture where outlandish conspiratorial thinking is common, the Hutaree militia of southeast Michigan is on the fringe. The group's leaders invented their own theology--the "doctrine of the Hutaree"--in which former NATO secretary-general Javier Solana is believed to be the Antichrist. The Hutaree's exalted commander is called a "radok"; deputies and lieutenants are known as "boromanders" and "zulifs." The secretive group was virtually unknown until last week, when the FBI arrested nine members of the Hutaree, including alleged leader David Brian Stone, on charges of "seditious conspiracy" and attempting to use weapons of mass destruction. Their alleged objective: to spark a war against the government by targeting its foot soldiers--local cops, whom the Hutaree referred to as "the brotherhood." Federal investigators say an 18-month probe revealed deadly plots in the works, including an alleged plan to kill a police officer and then attack mourners at his funeral with homemade bombs.

Stone's lawyer, William Swor, told Newsweek there is no evidence the group ever took steps to implement any of the alleged plots. "This is still America and people can say whatever they want," he said. But law-enforcement officials say the case adds to concerns about the growth of far-right militias and white supremacists. The rising anger and rhetoric of such groups--fueled, in part, by the economic downturn and the election of a black, Democratic president--has coincided with a rash of alarming incidents by extremists, including the neo-Nazi who went on a shooting rampage at the U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Extremist Reaction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.