A Kangaroo Court for Human Rights; the U.S. Should Denounce Lies of Israel-Haters

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 7, 2010 | Go to article overview

A Kangaroo Court for Human Rights; the U.S. Should Denounce Lies of Israel-Haters


Byline: Rabbi Abraham Cooper , SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Here they go again. Last April's so-called Durban II human rights conference, convened by the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) in Geneva, welcomed Iran's President Mahmoud Wipe Israel from the Map Ahmadinejad as its opening keynoter. On that day of infamy, more than 30 delegations, including Canada and the United States, walked out on the speech.

They should have kept walking.

Last month, UNHRC passed new, onerous resolutions against Israel - the only country designated as a permanent agenda item by the United Nations' chief global human rights address. One resolution urged reparations only for Palestinian victims of hostilities with Israel. Another established a committee of independent experts to oversee implementation of the notorious Goldstone Report, which condemns Israelis as war criminals for the crime of defending their country's citizens from 8,000 Hamas rockets. The anti-Israel assembly line ensures that serial abusers in Havana; Beijing; Khartoum, Sudan; Tripoli, Libya; or Tehran will never be put in the docket.

And what of the latest carnage in the Moscow subways? Don't hold your breath about UNHRC action against the scourge of the 21st century in finally declaring suicide bombings - whoever the perpetrators or targeted victims - crimes against humanity.

Which brings us to the question: Why is the United States still a party to this cruel farce?

Last year, the Obama administration took months before it followed Ottawa's lead in boycotting Durban II. Then it chose to re-engage the U.N.'s misnamed human rights central. Replacing Canada at the UNHRC, the United States joined Egypt - notorious for mistreatment of Coptic Christians - to introduce a seemingly innocuous resolution condemning racial and religious stereotyping. The 57-member Organization of the Islamic Conference took this as a green light for its own resolution condemning defamation of religion - meaning any criticism of Islam or Shariah law. This resolution passed this March - over U.S. and European objections that it failed to protect the individual's right to follow the religion of his choice or, God forbid, to criticize religion.

Then, 15 months after Israel's defensive incursion into Gaza's Hamastan, the UNHRC passed five mini-Goldstone resolutions institutionalizing the Goldstone Report's one-sided investigation of Israel and virtually stripping the Jewish state of the right to self-defense against nonstate terrorism. …

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