Saving Trees, One T-Shirt at a Time: Customers at Stanford University's Student Store No Longer Have to Receive Receipts

By Urban, Travis | CRM Magazine, April 2010 | Go to article overview

Saving Trees, One T-Shirt at a Time: Customers at Stanford University's Student Store No Longer Have to Receive Receipts


Urban, Travis, CRM Magazine


* Tell me about the Stanford's student store. Our store is totally student-operated. We're always looking for ways to get people motivated and into the store to boost revenues. We have our system where we process our orders--it's software that the cashiers use to tend their orders and keep track of inventory--a suite of programs called Microsoft Retail Management System (RMS). In the spring of 2009, we looked to several paperless-receipt solutions to provide a new utility to our customers. We decided to implement software from Transaction Tree because its implementation seemed to be more seamless than the other company we were considering. The implementation took only a weekend--two days of really intensive getting-things-figured-out and then a third day running tests. Transaction Tree wasn't replacing any system; rather, it was an additional supplement that we felt could be part of a cool campaign since we are also thinking about launching "green" items in the store.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

* Why was "going green" a priority? What other steps has the store taken? At first when we brought Transaction Tree on board, we were using it more as a cool tool to make life easier for customers by having their receipts sent and not printed. We were not thinking how many trees we would save, but over the summer we started thinking about getting more green items into the store--including 100 percent-recycled items and organic clothing. And we started promoting our cool email system. We were able to blend together the green efforts into this campaign to generate more excitement about the store. The green movement has been really catching on and so we wanted to latch on to that.

* How was the implementation? Transaction Tree and paperless receipts seemed like an easier solution for us as a business, as well. There's the small cost savings of buying paper for the printers, but what's especially nice is that Transaction Tree integrates seamlessly with Microsoft RMS. It's very intuitive for store managers and cashiers--the "training" only involved me sending out an email. The only new thing that changed [is] the cashiers see a message prompting them to ask, "Would you like the receipt printed, emailed, or both?"

The emails are stored on the Transaction Tree servers and there's no cost of memory storage to us. …

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