Election Is about More Than Marking Paper with a Cross; Politics Is in Need of a Revolution in Trust and Creativity Which Will Open Up a New Chapter in Democracy, Writes Robin Morrison of the Church in Wales the Thursday Essay

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), April 15, 2010 | Go to article overview

Election Is about More Than Marking Paper with a Cross; Politics Is in Need of a Revolution in Trust and Creativity Which Will Open Up a New Chapter in Democracy, Writes Robin Morrison of the Church in Wales the Thursday Essay


Byline: Robin Morrison

FUKUYAMA'S famous book "The End of History" was code for the end of a certain kind of political relationship between capitalism and communism in the Cold War years.

So the "end of politics" is one way of calling for the end of a certain kind of politics which no longer convinces or compels support.

Politics, as we know it, has ended because people no longer trust or respect politicians.

What's destroyed in weeks can take months and years or special events to be regained. The events just could be the general election and then the Wales elections.

What better chance to refresh the image, rebuild confidence and re-think the big questions? Politicians will be making a big mistake if they think the expenses scandal is the only issue. That's just one symptom of something deeper.

These are great times for real change, as we keep hearing. We so rarely get a chance to re-think and re-fashion how we relate to each other - for that is what politics really means.

Democracy is much more than marking a paper with a "cross" once every four years, or being invited to comment on consultation documents in between. That's politics at its most minimal and superficial.

The whole idea of democracy is participation and involvement. Re-thinking and re-fashioning a new politics cannot take place if we sit back on the sofa for four years and just moan about "them".

That leaves us with a sense of powerlessness and frustration, wondering why we even bother to vote in the first place. This kind of politics has become meaningless for most people.

We need to rediscover a new trust, risk and creativity at all levels. Without trust there can be no real involvement or shared responsibility.

The language of responsibility is the new social justice. This is a time to bring back powerful, inspirational ideas and words which have real meaning on a day to day basis - hope, trust, involvement, engagement.

Above all, yah-boo political self-interest has got to go. This is the old political world.

Adversarial style is fine in a university debating chamber or a law court. Adversarial politics is a tragic waste of time, energy and skills which could be better used on collaboration to transform the needs of the country and the common good.

If politicians want partnerships in civil society to work well, it's time they showed the way themselves.

Politics is far too important to let it spiral down into party or individual self-interest. Before online instant access and global media, these old games in Westminster, or even now in the Senedd, were played without anyone even noticing or caring. This is no longer good enough.

We have not elected politicians to spend the next four years defending their own parties and their narrow self-interest. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Election Is about More Than Marking Paper with a Cross; Politics Is in Need of a Revolution in Trust and Creativity Which Will Open Up a New Chapter in Democracy, Writes Robin Morrison of the Church in Wales the Thursday Essay
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.