Business School Administrators' and Faculty Perceptions of Online Learning: A Comparative Study

By Tanner, John R.; Noser, Thomas C. et al. | Issues in Innovation, Spring 2009 | Go to article overview

Business School Administrators' and Faculty Perceptions of Online Learning: A Comparative Study


Tanner, John R., Noser, Thomas C., Totaro, Michael W., Issues in Innovation


INTRODUCTION

The ever-increasing popularity of online programs may be due in no small measure to the growing number of adults who, both for personal or professional reasons, wish to earn a college degree, but are unable to relinquish their full-time jobs and attend on-campus, daytime classes (Roberts, 1998). Fortunately, the technological infrastructure needed to address the growing interest in online education is readily available, thus making the availability of online courses both economical and practical (Totaro et al., 2005). This study compares business school administrators' perceptions of online learning and business faculty perceptions of online learning. Business school administrators and business faculty are from various disciplines, such as accounting, economics, finance, management, management information systems, and marketing.

The collective demographics of college students have changed considerably from college students of, say, twenty years ago, where the typical college student was between 18 and 22 years old. Colleges and universities are catering increasingly to the "non-traditional" college student, whose age tends to be 23 years or older, married with children, and employed full-time (U. S. Department of Education, 2002). Online learning appears to offer the "non-traditional" student a practical alternative to on-campus courses.

Online learning may be delivered either synchronously or asynchronously. In the case of synchronous delivery, time boundaries usually are imposed, since the instructor and students must be online simultaneously. An alternative mode to synchronous delivery of online learning is asynchronous delivery, where neither time- nor place-boundaries are of much concern.

The virtual removal of time and place boundaries by online learning presents a practical means by which the non-traditional student may earn college credit, or even earn a college degree. Thus, interest in developing new online education programs, as well as strengthening existing ones, continues to increase. Still, questions regarding the quality of online courses--particularly as they compare with their in-class counterparts--may be of both practical and intellectual interest to academics, practitioners, and students (Phillips, 1998; Webster and Hackley, 1997).

Concerns about the quality of online courses are not without merit. This may be due in no small measure to a lack of consensus among online course participants (i.e., students, faculty, and administrators) about how the success (or failure) of online courses might be measured. Moreover, each participant group might conceivably hold differing opinions about, and perceptions of, what constitutes online course quality.

Because the delivery mechanism of online courses is substantially different from traditional in-class courses, common sense might suggest that attitudes and perceptions by participants--students, faculty, staff, and administrators--in online education are integral to the success (or failure) of online courses. Thus, insights about attitudes and perceptions of online learning participants may be useful to universities and colleges as they endeavor to design and deploy online courses at their institutions.

Administrators are uniquely positioned to authorize and fund online courses; faculty contribute directly to such courses. Thus, an understanding about attitudes and perceptions of both groups are important for the development and offering of online courses. The roles assumed by the members of each group are presumably heterogeneous; this suggests that there may be differences in attitudes and perceptions between them. We intend to investigate these potential differences by way of analysis of survey results.

RESEARCH QUESTIONS

From the foregoing discussion, we pose the following two research questions, both of which we address in our study:

1. How do attitudes and perceptions about online learning by business school administrators and business faculty members compare with one another? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Business School Administrators' and Faculty Perceptions of Online Learning: A Comparative Study
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.