Deterring a 'Dirty Bomb'

By Begley, Sharon | Newsweek, April 26, 2010 | Go to article overview

Deterring a 'Dirty Bomb'


Begley, Sharon, Newsweek


Byline: Sharon Begley

Why we need nuclear forensics.

It's great that the 47 nations at last week's nuclear--security summit pledged to safeguard their nuclear materials so terrorists can't, say, nuke Times Square or set off a dirty bomb in the Tokyo subway. After all, as President Obama said, "we know that organizations like Al Qaeda are -- trying to secure a nuclear weapon," and there is "a lot of loose nuclear material around the world"; nations must start "locking [it] down."

But even people who lock their doors can be robbed. To keep loose nukes out of the hands of terrorists, the world needs the successor to the deterrent power of mutual assured destruction (MAD) during the Cold War, when a nuclear attack would have come by missile with a de facto return address. Today, although a group like Al Qaeda might gloat about a successful attack, to rat out its source would be self-defeating, since it would assure retaliation against that source and eliminate it as a supplier.

The needed successor to MAD is, therefore, nuclear forensics and attribution: the science of inferring the source of nuclear materials from their chemical and isotopic properties. "If we could pinpoint the origin of nuclear material used in a terrorist attack, it would deter countries from allowing poor security at their nuclear facilities," says Benn Tannenbaum of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). More bluntly, if hostile regimes perceive that the U.S. has an effective nuclear attribution capability, they might be deterred from helping terrorists obtain nuclear materials. (At least 40 countries have enough highly enriched uranium to build a crude atomic weapon, and 13 have enough reactor-grade plutonium.)

The U.S. has not stood out in advancing the cause of nuclear attribution even at home. A 2008 analysis by physicists and nuclear chemists for the American Physical Society and AAAS concluded the U.S. has too few experts (about 50) in nuclear attribution, and many are close to retirement. Training programs for the minimum of 35 new Ph.D.s needed over the next decade are "inadequate and underfunded," it warned; equipment to analyze debris after a detonation falls short of "the most modern and effective standards that prevail" in such countries as Japan and France.

Yet a 2008 bill was stripped of $4 million authorized to train experts. Even the Nuclear Forensics and Attribution Act that Obama signed in February "doesn't have any money" to remedy the shortfall of equipment and expertise, says Tannenbaum. …

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