Integrating the Design Mathematical Trail in Mathematics Curriculum for the Sixth Grade Student

By Tsao, Yea-Ling | Journal of Instructional Psychology, March 2010 | Go to article overview

Integrating the Design Mathematical Trail in Mathematics Curriculum for the Sixth Grade Student


Tsao, Yea-Ling, Journal of Instructional Psychology


The article focused on the teaching materials of the sixth grade mathematics field and selected four units with the topics of "measurement and actual calculation" of figures and space to design the mathematical trail teaching activities with the characteristics of the school and expect to provide mathematical trail teaching activities for the sixth grade students and connect the mathematical courses in the classroom with the lives of the surrounding for increasing the students' interests and effects on mathematics.

Key word: Mathematical trail, mathematics learning, elementary student

**********

Mathematics should be closely connected with everyone's life. American educational philosopher John Dewey had the claim of "education is life". We can say that "mathematics is life". Freudenthal (1973) proposed the idea of realistic mathematics and indicated that mathematical education should be based on cognitive development in children, and treat realistic situations in their lives as a core allowing children the ability to apply mathematical knowledge through the activities of life and recognize the mathematical relation and laws from experience to further internalize the concept. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (2000) also emphasized that mathematics education at school should be based on the children's informal mathematical concept and experience developed in living situations, and the mathematical knowledge learned from school to design the question situations for children to discuss, solve, reason, prove and communicate.

The grade 4-9 curriculum outline proposed by The Ministry of Education of Taiwan "treated the students as the subjects", "focused on life experience" and cultivated the students the "mobile" basic capacities so that students could look for related clues from life experience and connect the academic subjects by a meaningful topic. In this situation, knowledge is involved in the experience, the students' learning interests are enhanced and more abilities are stimulated (Ministry of Education of Taiwan, 2003). Thus, teachers should try to guide students with the issues "related to the students' daily life experience" and look for materials connected with the students' lives in order to design teaching materials to trigger students' motivations. The "Mathematical trail" was the teaching material meeting the students' life experience and functioned as the teachers reference (Tsai, 2000). The "Campus mathematical trail" used the present environmental resources on campus as the teaching materials. Through concrete teaching activities and following the units of teaching activities, it edited proper teaching material activities and employed the findings and solutions of mathematical problems as the teaching method of mathematics involved in lives. When the teachers led the students to walk on the mathematical trail outside the classroom, the habitual restriction of the teachers' instruction was lost. Since the teachers didn't have black or white boards, verbal descriptions and students' interaction would increase strengthening the diversity of mathematical teaching and learning. The mathematical problems specifically presented by the mathematical trail were actually very unique and these questions could not be found elsewhere. It selected the local unique hardware model and turned the materials related to mathematics into mathematical questions so that the students would feel that they were surrounded by mathematics-related materials. (Huang, 2005).

This article focuses on the teaching materials of the sixth grade mathematics field. It selects four units with the topics of "measurement and actual calculation" of figures and space to design the mathematical trail of teaching activities with the characteristics of the school. It expects to provide mathematical trail teaching activities for the sixth grade students and connect the mathematical courses in the classroom with the lives of the surrounding for the purpose of increasing students' interests and effects on mathematics. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Integrating the Design Mathematical Trail in Mathematics Curriculum for the Sixth Grade Student
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.