'Racial Profiling'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 22, 2010 | Go to article overview

'Racial Profiling'


Byline: James Morrison, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

'RACIAL PROFILING'

The Mexican Embassy is denouncing as racist a bill passed by the Arizona Legislature that would require police to determine the immigration status of people suspected of entering the United States illegally.

Mexican Embassy spokesman Ricardo Alday said his government is deeply concerned by the potential dire effects of the Arizona bill, which was passed by the Legislature and is awaiting for Gov. Jan Brewer's signature. An estimated 13 million foreigners are living in the United States illegally, with several hundred thousand in Arizona.

As it has been raised by national Latino and immigration rights organizations, initiatives that exclusively criminalize immigration create opportunities for an undue enforcement of the law through racial profiling, Mr. Alday said.

The law targets illegal, not legal, immigrants. It would allow local and state police to determine the immigration status of people detained under reasonable suspicion they are in the United States illegally.

Mr. Alday also warned of the likelihood of negative effects that this measure .. may have for the future development of friendship, commercial, tourist and cultural ties

between Mexico and Arizona

Recently Mexican Ambassador Arturo Sarukhan warned of racism among opponents of illegal immigration.

We must seek to push back against those who would inject prejudice, hate and xenophobia in a debate that needs to be waged on the merits of sound arguments and not through baseless polarization, he wrote in the embassy's latest newsletter.

In Arizona on Wednesday, the state senator who sponsored the bill criticized the Mexican Embassy for injecting itself into a U.S. domestic matter.

This is simply, simply outrageous, Sen. Russell Pearce told Embassy Row.

He said his bill specifically prohibits racial profiling and guarantees civil rights, adding that it also gives police discretion when detaining people suspected of a crime.

I wouldn't tolerate anything else, he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Racial Profiling'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.