Race Crime: More Than 16 Are Victims Each Day

Daily Mail (London), April 28, 2010 | Go to article overview

Race Crime: More Than 16 Are Victims Each Day


Byline: Graham Grant Home Affairs Editor

THE number of race crime victims in Scotland has soared to record levels, fuelling fears of a growing backlash against rising immigration.

New figures show that 5,972 people were the target of racist offences in 2008-2009 - more than 16 per day.

Shockingly, one in four such crimes were committed by children under 16.

There has also been a four-fold increase in the number of white, non-British victims from places such as Eastern Europe.

Scotland has seen a surge in racially motivated attacks since Poland, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia joined the EU in 2004.

The figures, released yesterday by the Scottish Executive, showed the number of race crime victims hit 5,059 in 2004-2005, soaring to 5,788 in 2007-2008.

The latest leap means the number has risen by 18 per cent in five years. Victims described as 'other white' - white, but not British or Irish - rocketed from 130 in 2004-2005 to 508 in 2008-09.

There were 1,584 Pakistani victims and 1,091 were described as 'white British'. Others came from countries including the Caribbean, Africa and China.

Racist incidents are defined as any 'perceived to be racist by the victim or any other person'. …

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