How to Design Culturally Responsive Lesson Plans: A Guide for Pre-Service Teachers

By Frye, Barbara J. | Black History Bulletin, Spring 2010 | Go to article overview

How to Design Culturally Responsive Lesson Plans: A Guide for Pre-Service Teachers


Frye, Barbara J., Black History Bulletin


Connections to Teacher Preparation

Due to the underrepresentation of the historical achievements of African Americans within the current educational system, it is necessary for pre-service teachers to understand the principles underpinning culturally responsive pedagogy and understand how to develop a classroom environment and construct lessons that are sensitive and responsive to children who come from diverse cultures.

Goals of the Lesson

Pre-service teachers will learn how to develop culturally responsive lesson plans by incorporating standards, textbooks, and other ancillary materials such as The Mis-Education of the Negro by Dr. Carter G. Woodson and the Study Guide to The Mis-Education of the Negro (available online at http://www.asalh.org/files/Miseducation_Study_Guide.pdf). The authors of the study guide, Spencer et al., seek to keep the lessons of Carter G. Woodson's seminal book alive and relevant for 21st-century educators. The authors state that one of Woodson's underlying themes is "If you distort a people's history, you will eventually distort a people's future." They believe that Woodson's message can help to remedy cultural inequities today, including "impoverished Black communities, inadequate schools, and poor job opportunities." The authors challenge educators to form an appropriate response to these issues in their teaching in order to ensure that African American students are fairly represented at all levels of education by utilizing culturally responsive pedagogy within all teaching methodologies and strategies.

Objective

Pre-service teachers will select a lesson that they have already prepared or create a new lesson. They will then use the following criteria to analyze, revise, or create their lesson to ensure it is based on culturally responsive pedagogical principles.

National Council for Social Studies (NCSS) Standards

Culture and Cultural Diversity

* Assist learners to understand and apply the concept of culture as an integrated whole that governs the functions and interaction of language, literature, arts, traditions, beliefs, values, and behavior patterns.

* Enable learners to analyze and explain how groups, societies, and cultures address human needs and concerns

* Have learners interpret patterns of behavior as reflecting values and attitudes, which contribute to or post obstacles to cross--cultural understanding.

History

* Guide learners in acquiring knowledge of the history and values of diverse civilizations throughout the world including those of the West, and in comparing patterns of continuity and change in different parts of the world.

Foundations of Education

* Read The Mis-Education of the Negro

* Read the Study Guide to the Mis-Education of the Negro

Chapter Summaries from the Study Guide to the Mis-Education of the Negro

Chapter 3--How We Drifted Away from the Truth

Chapter Summary: Woodson argues that whether in science, history, or literature, Whites have been taught that their cultural contributions to American society were superior to those of Blacks. This type of teaching, he believes, has built "in Whites a race bate of the Negro, and in the Negroes contempt for themselves." This is one of the main themes of Woodson's book: If you distort a people's history, you will eventually distort a people's future. The perpetuation of inaccuracies in the historical record, which elevated European culture and denigrated that of Africans, was a grave injustice in Woodson's view.

Chapter 4--Education under Outside Control

Chapter Summary: There is a direct link between the type of education and training you receive and your future work or career. Your ability to make a living, care for a family, and contribute to your community are all heavily determined by the educational opportunities made available to you, and how well you make use of these opportunities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

How to Design Culturally Responsive Lesson Plans: A Guide for Pre-Service Teachers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.