This Just in! BHET (Black History Education Television) Network

By Hopkins, Adrienne; Garrett, Kendra | Black History Bulletin, Spring 2010 | Go to article overview

This Just in! BHET (Black History Education Television) Network


Hopkins, Adrienne, Garrett, Kendra, Black History Bulletin


Connections to High School

Current high school students live in a post--civil rights era, and many are not aware of the history of people of color in the United States. This lesson is designed to help students understand what civil rights activists were fighting for.

Goals of the Lesson Plan

Enhance students' understanding of the civil rights movement (from the platform of Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech) and whether the goals of the movement have been fulfilled.

Objectives

1. Students will conduct research on the "Dream" of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., as well as efforts that have been made since his death to make his dream a reality, including amendments to the Constitution and precedents set by court cases.

2. Students will compare and contrast the application of civil rights prior to the Civil Rights Act and now.

3. Students will be able to identify Dr. King's "Dream" as well as 8-10 efforts that have been made since MLK's death.

4. Students will work with a partner to research a particular piece of Dr. King's Dream and the effort made to change the behavior using the Internet and traditional methods.

5. Students will write their own 1- to 3-minute "I Have a Dream" speech.

6. Students will produce a 3- to 5-minute oral and visual presentation in a news report style/format.

National Council for Social Studies Standards

* Guide learners in practicing skills of historical analysis and interpretation, such as compare and contrast, differentiate between historical facts and interpretations, consider multiple perspectives, analyze cause and effect relationships, compare competing historical narratives, recognize the tentative nature of historical interpretations, and hypothesize the influence of the past

* Help learners to identify issues and problems in the past, recognize factors contributing to such problems, identify and analyze alternative courses of action, formulate a position or course of action, and evaluate the implementation of that decision

* Help learners analyze group and institutional influences on people, events, and elements of culture in both historical and contemporary settings

Time Allotted: 7 Class Periods

Day 1: Introduce lesson and begin research.

Warm-up: Students will get into groups of 3 or 4 and discuss what Dr. …

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