Bringing Power to the People; as We Approach One of the Most Fascinating Elections in Generations Dawn Collinson Looks at Political Campaigns over the Decades: And the Winner?

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), May 1, 2010 | Go to article overview

Bringing Power to the People; as We Approach One of the Most Fascinating Elections in Generations Dawn Collinson Looks at Political Campaigns over the Decades: And the Winner?


Byline: Dawn Collinson

THERE are just five days left before the nation goes to the polls and the country gets a new government - or maybe just more of the old one.

For the first time this year, three televised debates have allowed voters to see the party leaders and would-be prime ministers up close and personal, breaking into a sweat under the combined heat of studio lights and tough questioning.

It's a thoroughly modern X Factor-style approach to a General Election and a far cry from the days when most constituents didn't even have a television on which to watch the results.

Instead, in Liverpool, they would gather in front of St George's Hall to hear their political fate being announced over loud speakers.

This is just one of many election day traditions captured over the years by ECHO photographers. In this week's Flashback we take a look at some other memorable moments and characters from Liverpool's political past.

One of Liverpool's best-loved political figures, 'Battling' Bessie Braddock was known as an ardent Socialist and fiery campaigner. Elected Member of Parliament for Liverpool Exchange at the 1945 election, she represented the seat for 24 years. This photo, left, captioned 'Bessie back again', shows her unable to contain her delight after her victory in 1964.

The long arm of the law comes to the assistance of a group of nurses from the Royal Infirmary when they arrive to record their votes at the polling station in Vine Street, just off Myrtle Street in the city centre, in 1955 TRAP-PED: Setting out to catch the floating voter, Mr Beattie Edwards - Conservative candidate for Exchange division - goes on the campaign trail with bell in hand and a little four-legged help in 1959 GAUGE:The BBC might have had its famous swingometer, but Liverpool had its own way of keeping track of the state of the parties as it changed over the hours. …

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Bringing Power to the People; as We Approach One of the Most Fascinating Elections in Generations Dawn Collinson Looks at Political Campaigns over the Decades: And the Winner?
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