Loyalty Is Earned: Our Relationships Equal Our Success. as Managers, Our Success Is Contingent upon Getting the Most out of the People in Our Organizations. despite Its Importance, However, This Concept Is One Management Truth That Is Seldom Taught in Business School

By Keiningham, Timothy; Aksoy, Lerzan et al. | Talent Development, July 2009 | Go to article overview

Loyalty Is Earned: Our Relationships Equal Our Success. as Managers, Our Success Is Contingent upon Getting the Most out of the People in Our Organizations. despite Its Importance, However, This Concept Is One Management Truth That Is Seldom Taught in Business School


Keiningham, Timothy, Aksoy, Lerzan, Williams, Luke, Talent Development


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Therefore, it's little wonder that we do an incredibly poor job of building relationships in our professional lives. Our research finds that only one in 10 managers invests a great deal of time in building relationships with colleagues at work. As a result, only one out of 10 feels a strong connection to their company, peers, and the people who report directly to them.

The problem this creates for organizations and individuals is far reaching. Research clearly shows that the most productive, most innovative teams within companies are built on strong relationships. A manager's loyalty and that of his colleagues is strongly driven by the connections he feels with others at work. And even his happiness is in large part a function of his bonds at work.

Building a loyalty-driven organization won't just happen as a natural course of events. It requires questioning some current beliefs and changing some longstanding behaviors.

Self-improvement

Building loyal relationships professionally and personally should always begin with a valid self-assessment. Improving connections with others invariably begins with improving oneself as a leader, manager, and colleague. Knowing how one interacts with others is critical. Where do your loyalties really lie?

Most people believe that they are much more loyal--and therefore much more deserving of loyalty--than others perceive them to be. Therefore, being completely objective in self evaluation and the input gathered from others regarding perceptions of our loyalty is critical. But let's not kid ourselves either--this is very hard to do. As the author Aldous Huxley observed, "If most of us remain ignorant of ourselves, it is because self-knowledge is painful and we prefer the pleasures of illusion."

Employees' perceptions of the organization

Organizational psychologist Rensis Likert once observed, "The greater the loyalty of a group toward the group, the greater is the motivation among the members to achieve the goals of the group, and the greater the probability that the group will achieve its goals." Unfortunately, virtually all of us sense a decline in employee loyalty in comparison with our parents' and grandparents' generations.

Collecting information on employee loyalty is simple. All it requires is a good survey process. The key is to provide a forum where employees feel comfortable sharing their real feelings without fear of a negative backlash.

Realize that while getting information on employee loyalty is relatively straightforward, meaningfully acting on this information typically is not. It requires assessing and adjusting the policies, practices, and procedures of the organization as well as the behaviors that get rewarded, supported, and expected with regard to relationship building.

The goals and dreams of your colleagues

No one goes to work to make someone else rich. While most people work in part because they have to do so to survive, they also want work to give them a sense of accomplishment.

Managers need to help those who report to them, and those with whom they work directly to get greater fulfillment from their work. …

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Loyalty Is Earned: Our Relationships Equal Our Success. as Managers, Our Success Is Contingent upon Getting the Most out of the People in Our Organizations. despite Its Importance, However, This Concept Is One Management Truth That Is Seldom Taught in Business School
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