MY PRINCE HAS COME; Persia Star Gemma Romped with 007 but Her Man Beasts Bond

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), May 10, 2010 | Go to article overview

MY PRINCE HAS COME; Persia Star Gemma Romped with 007 but Her Man Beasts Bond


Byline: Siobhan Synot

THE year 2010 is shaping up to be huge for Gemma Arterton - on screen and in her private life.

So far she's been romanced in swords-and-sandals blockbuster Clash of the Titans, kidnapped by Martin Compston in The Disappearance of Alice Creed, and is about to reign over ancient Iraq and video geeks alike when she teams up with Jake Gyllenhaal for Disney blockbuster Prince of Persia.

Last night, she wowed crowds in London at the world premiere of Prince of Persia. Next week, she's back on the red carpet once more to wow the Cannes crowd at the world premiere of yet another of her movies, Tamara Drewe.

But her most demanding role is this summer when Gemma ties the knot with her fianc of 12 months, Stefano Catelli.

Stefano, an Italian sales manager who works for a British fashion company, popped the question at the Download music festival last summer and Gemma has been turning down work so that she can take a few months' break with her new hubby. "It was absolutely instant," said the Quantum of Solace Bond babe.

"I remember going home the night after I met him and writing in my diary that I'd met the man I'm going to marry. I gave that diary entry to him for his birthday two weeks later. But it didn't freak him out, because he was thinking the same thing. I just really want to spend the rest of my life with him. He's an amazing man."

It's been a whirlwind romance for the 24-year-old, previously linked to Spanish stuntman Eduardo Munoz, who taught her to ride horses for Prince of Persia.

Between movies and premieres, she's been trying to sort her big day, including an ultra-romantic, silhouette-hugging dress.

"My fianc loves me most when I wake up in the morning wrapped up in the bedsheets," she revealed. "My wedding gown is kind of like that."

It's all go for Gemma, a down-to-earth girl from a working-class single-parent family in Gravesend, Kent.

Just three years ago, she was working on a make-up counter to pay her way through drama school.

Then she landed her first movie role - as the sexy head girl of St Trinians. Since then, she's hardly stopped working, racketing up an astonishing 11 movie appearances.

Directors have raved about her dark good looks and her acting chops - but Gemma reckons that she landed the plum part of the Middle Eastern princess in Prince of Persia by swearing.

Beforehand, Gemma reckoned the role would go to a big star like Natalie Portman and decided she had nothing to lose by just showing up and being herself.

However, when she auditioned for Harry Potter director Mike Newell, he clocked her soft southern accent and wondered out loud whether she could talk like a toffy royal.

She proved she was perfect for Persia's feisty princess by putting on a posh accent. She told the director: "Yes I can. Because I went to the Royal Academy of F***ing Dramatic Arts."

She said: "Mike immediately said, 'Oh God, I love her!' And later he told me he decided right then he had to have me as Tasmina because I was funny. But for the rest of the film, he would ask - "WHERE did you go, Gemma?"

But not everyone was convinced when it was announced Gemma would play Princess Tasmina, who teams up with rival prince Jake Gyllenhaal to save the world from self-destructing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

MY PRINCE HAS COME; Persia Star Gemma Romped with 007 but Her Man Beasts Bond
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.