Defense Trade Cooperation Treaties between the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia

DISAM Journal, March 2010 | Go to article overview

Defense Trade Cooperation Treaties between the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia


[The following are excerpts from testimony by Andrew J. Shapiro, Assistant Secretary, United States Department of State, Political-Military Affairs, before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Washington, D.C., December 10, 2009.]

Thank you for holding this hearing and for the opportunity to testify before the Committee on the two bilateral Defense Trade Cooperation Treaties between the United States and the United Kingdom (Treaty Document 110-7) and the United States and Australia (Treaty Document 110-10). The ratification of these treaties is strongly supported by this Administration.

The insights and questions provided by the Committee have helped to guide this Administration's review of the treaties and informed the detailed draft regulations that the Department of State (DOS) will publish once the treaties are ratified.

This Administration has conducted an exhaustive review of the treaties and their effect on United States' national security and foreign policy interests. I have met officials from the United Kingdom and Australia to discuss the treaties and their importance to our bilateral relationships. We have worked closely with representatives from the Department of Defense (DOD) to evaluate the treaties' ability to enhance interoperability with these important partners, while maintaining our national security interests. We have also worked with the Department of Justice and the Department of Homeland Security in order to ensure that the provisions of the treaties can be implemented and enforced under current United States law. Today, I affirm to you that the President and his Administration fully support the treaties and believe they will establish a stable framework through which we can enhance our strategic relationship and battlefield readiness with these two key allies in the future.

When we speak about the details of these treaties and the framework that they establish, it is easy to lose sight of the exceedingly important role that these treaties are designed to play. I would like to share a few examples with you.

When United States and coalition forces are attacked, an improvised explosive device (IED) explodes, or a suicide bomber murders civilians, conducting a forensic investigation of the scene is essential. The information gained by such an investigation helps determine the sources of insurgent arms, ammunition, and explosives; it greatly supports the gathering and analysis of intelligence, which helps us stem the flow of arms to insurgents. It allows us to identify ways in which we can better protect our forces in combat, and it allows us to identify the dead and to prosecute the guilty. Our military has highlighted the fact that there is an urgent need to improve current capabilities in this key area. The Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics has stated that the treaties, if ratified, could facilitate United States, U.K., or Australian research and development that is needed to meet this urgent need. The DOD has already awarded a number of contracts in this area, and the treaties would enhance United States industry's ability to engage in technical discussions on this subject with U.K. and Australian companies. Such companies could provide solutions to technological challenges, reduce costs, and accelerate delivery of expeditionary forensic capabilities to coalition forces. Without the treaties, the ability of engineers and other scientists to just discuss the export-controlled technology associated with expeditionary forensic capabilities could be subject to many more bureaucratic processes and proceed much less seamlessly than with the treaty exemption regime in place. In this case, the treaties could be used to help meet this urgent need more effectively and even more quickly.

Another urgent requirement is the need to field non-lethal capabilities for counter-piracy and maritime counter-terrorism. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Defense Trade Cooperation Treaties between the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.