Restoring 'Peace through Strength'; A Platform for Preserving American Freedom and Security

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 11, 2010 | Go to article overview

Restoring 'Peace through Strength'; A Platform for Preserving American Freedom and Security


In a world characterized by growing threats to freedom and the U.S. Constitution, America's exceptional role, and indeed our country's very existence, is at risk. We believe such times demand a robust, comprehensive national security posture appropriate to today's threats and tomorrow's. Toward that end, we espouse and will work to achieve the following:

1. Renewed adherence to the national security philosophy of President Ronald Reagan: Peace through strength. American security is most reliably assured by having military forces that are fully trained, equipped and ready to deter or defeat the nation's adversaries.

2. A robust defense posture including a safe, reliable, effective nuclear deterrent, which requires its modernization and testing; the deployment of comprehensive defenses against missile attack; and national protection against unconventional forms of warfare, including biological, electromagnetic pulse and cyber-attacks.

3. Preservation of U.S. sovereignty against international treaties, judicial rulings and other measures that would have the effect of supplanting or otherwise diminishing the U.S. Constitution and the representative, accountable form of government it guarantees.

4. A nation free of Shariah, the brutally repressive and anti-constitutional, totalitarian program that governs in Saudi Arabia, Iran and other Islamic states and that terrorists are fighting to impose worldwide.

5. Protection from unlawful enemy combatants. Enemies who refuse to wear uniforms, use civilians as shields and employ terrorism as weapons are not entitled to U.S. constitutional rights or trials in our civilian courts. Those captured overseas should be incarcerated at the Guantanamo Bay detention center, which should remain open, or in other prisons outside the United States.

6. …

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