Somalia

By Dodds, Klaus | Geographical, March 2010 | Go to article overview

Somalia


Dodds, Klaus, Geographical


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The end of last year saw an increase in unrest in central Somalia, as pro-government militias and Islamist rebels battled for control of the region. The fighting saw more than 150 people killed and thousands displaced, with some 3,000 Somalis registered as refugees in Ethiopia in December alone.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The violence was far from unusual in a country that has had no effective national government since the overthrow of president Mohamed Siad Barre in 1991.

Located on the Horn of Africa, Somalia became independent in 1960 following the amalgamation of British and Italian Somaliland. Dominated by desert, the country covers an area of 637,657 square kilometres, and has a population estimated at around 9.8 million, 85 per cent of whom are Somali. Relations with its near neighbours Ethiopia, Djibouti and Kenya have often been marred by disputes over territorial boundaries and clan loyalties.

The country is dominated by an informal economy largely sustained by agriculture and remittance exchanges. The former is the most important sector (40 per cent of GDP), and exports include bananas, fish and livestock. With no formal banking sector, transfer/remittance services are important, and it's estimated that at least US$2billion a year in remittances pass through the country. Ransom money from piracy operations, which have becoming increasingly sophisticated in recent years, has netted at least US$80million, with the payments subsequently distributed among militias, local officials and offshore sponsors.

Instability and factional fighting have marred the country's post-colonial history. Following a coup in 1969, Siad Barre emerged as the country's leader and ushered in an era of socialism-inspired authoritarian government. His regime collapsed in 1991, in part due to the cessation of the Cold War, and the country's political structures quickly followed suit, resulting in an ill-fated UN intervention in 1993-95. Somalia then suffered internal division as northern clans in regions such as Awdal and Sool declared an independent Republic of Somaliland, while the northeastern region of Nugaal declared itself the autonomous state of Puntland. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Somalia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.