Brave Meningitis

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), May 27, 2010 | Go to article overview

Brave Meningitis


Byline: KERRY WOOD

SHE was robbed of her legs and hand by a killer disease, but survivor Vivienne Bell is staying strong and hoping for a happier future.

Now two years after her life was devastated by meningitis and septicaemia, the 58-year-old says she is finally starting to get herself back to some kind of normality. In August the mother-of-three will undergo the last of a string of operations after the diseases ate away at the skin and muscle tissue on her legs, hand and fingers.

Back at home, after spending eight months in hospital, Vivienne said: "This has been extremely hard for my family, and it has taken a lot to get to this point, but it can be done. We are better than we were, and each tomorrow will be even better. I'm going to have plastic surgery to create a thumb so I'll be able to grip and hopefully I'll be able to get back to do the day-to-day things I used to do.

"Even being able to wash a few dishes and polish makes all the difference, and I can't wait to get out into the garden."

What started out as a sore throat and headaches quickly escalated and left Vivienne in a coma and fighting for her life.

I had wonderful On May 17, 2008, she'd gone to bed feeling unwell. But by 2am the next day she'd come out in a rash, called 999 and was put in an induced coma as medics fought desperately to save her life. After numerous tests, the mobile hairdresser, who lives in Washington with husband Richard, 63, was diagnosed with meningococcal meningitis and spent nine weeks in a coma while her body was subjected to numerous drugs. Richard was told to before "and now was different.

every - that cope as prepare for the worst after his wife's health headed downhill fast.

He said: "The doctors took me to one side and said they were going to bombard her with drugs, and that it was touch and go for those first 48 hours. I stayed by her bedside and watched a dramatic change in her appearance. The purple rash had turned to black and it was everywhere, on her face, her hands, her feet. It was like someone had poured ink on her."

Richard and her children Jayne, 38, Richard, 34, and 27-year-old Sarah, waited in hope that one day they'd get their mum back. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Brave Meningitis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.