OPINION NUGGETS; Nullifying Health Care

The Florida Times Union, May 27, 2010 | Go to article overview

OPINION NUGGETS; Nullifying Health Care


A number of states, including Florida, are seeking to nullify national health care.

This debate is one for Constitutional scholars that mostly involve some classic state's rights issues.

But there is one precedent in play reports Timothy Jost in The New England Journal of Medicine. More than a quarter of the states have legalized medical marijuana despite a federal prohibition.

The federal government basically has declined to enforce the federal law as an inefficient use of limited resources.

Similarly, would the federal government decide that the federal health care can't be enforced in the face of widespread resistance?

Stay tuned.

EUROPEAN SOCIALISM

The term is not easily defined, but worries that the United States is heading to European-style socialism have some validity.

The New York Times reported on Sunday that European nations are having to scale back on their social welfare promises in light of tight budgets.

- Public social spending in the European Union in 2005: 21 percent. In the U.S., 15.9 percent.

- In France, social spending has hit 31 percent.

So how are Europeans coping? They are working longer. Germany raised the retirement age to 67.

In Sweden and Switzerland, seven in 10 people work past age 50; In France, five in 10 do.

Note that European nations spend a lot less on the military than the United States, so the differences in social spending are even more stark.

Add the fact that European nations have a much older population than America, with our influx of immigrants, and there is an economic crisis brewing overseas. …

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