DepEd Explains Sex Education Plan

Manila Bulletin, June 5, 2010 | Go to article overview

DepEd Explains Sex Education Plan


Sex education is not all about making love.

This clarification was made by the Department of Education (DepEd) last Friday after drawing strong opposition from the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) against the plan to teach sex education to elementary pupils and high school students when classes start on June 15.The statement was made by Education Secretary Mona Valisno after Malacanang asked the DepEd to defer its plan to integrate sex education in the basic curriculum until consultations are done with Church leaders and after addressing the concerns of the CBCP.Valisno clarified that classroom discussions on sex education that will be piloted in almost 160 schools - 79 public high schools and 80 elementary schools - is not about the sex act but "on the science of reproduction, physical care and hygiene, correct values and the norms of interpersonal relations to avoid pre-marital sex and teen-age pregnancy."She said the contents of the modules that will be integrated in core subjects are scientific, informative, and are not designed to titillate prurient interest. "For example in science, the reproductive system and reproductive cycle have always been part of the curriculum, including the changes that happen during puberty," Valisno said.The DepEd chief also emphasized that "the role of teachers is to educate young people on issues that directly affect them and empower them to make informed choices and decisions. …

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