Alwin Reamillo: On the Aesthetics of Flight

Manila Bulletin, June 6, 2010 | Go to article overview

Alwin Reamillo: On the Aesthetics of Flight


Oftentimes the label "aesthetics" implies artistic matter of great conceptual magnitude. It is the genius of art presented, verbalized in a form equivalent in caliber, but never quite lending itself to the hands of the general public. It glorifies the masterpieces, those that remain preserved timelessly in galleries and museums, those that remain perpetually unknown and impractical to the people living and breathing in their shabby havens far from art. Oftentimes the label "aesthetics" does not concern itself with matters of society, of politics, of history.

But this is not such time, at least not for the case of Alwin Reamillo. His idea of aesthetics elevates the label to widen its artistic scope, so that it not only covers the technicalities of art, but also its social, political and historical dimensions. This is Alwin Reamillo's aesthetics of flight: It is the philosophy of art-making which seeks to create "social sculptures" (as quoted from Joseph Beuys) instead of visual icons, and which aims to provide an artistic space, an open space meant for creation, artistic collaborations and elevations both in spirit and in society.

The formation of these grandiose ideas of community art began when Reamillo was still a child, being exposed to the piano-making workshop of his family's business. "I was never really interested in pianos," Reamillo confesses, "because I grew up with them. To me, they're just ordinary." His father, Decimo Reamillo, was the piano-maker of the family, and witnessing how his father worked made a great impact in the way he perceived art. "Though my father made the pianos, he was always behind the shadows," he recalls. Reamillo shares how his father would take pleasure in seeing happy customers but would never take credit for a job well done, and how he managed a team of artists in the workshop, where a person's craft does not overpower another because, in the end, they all meld into a single unit. This was something Reamillo carried with him in his travels and in his art.

The mix-up of media and matter in Reamillo's works-whether in the form of helicopters or pianos-metaphorizes the history with which he grew up. It is especially evident in his piano works since it is, after all, his father's legacy to him. His pianos display a certain digression from the typical make-up of the instrument, what with the different details he adds. In the bottom panel of one of his upright pianos, for instance, he incorporates an image from Mutya ng Pasig in reference to Nicanor Abelardo's kundiman. Although the piano is Western in origin, Reamillo's piano works contain the necessary whims and fancies that soften the severity of the piano's appearance. In effect, they easily accommodate the Filipino pianist's musical creations and compositions without stressing about doing justice to the strict technicalities of piano-playing. It invites the pianist to forget the rigid rules and let his/her music take off and fly on its own, landing only whenever it pleases. In creating his art piece, then, Reamillo creates room for another creation to take place.

Setting this project up, however, is far from easy. Returning in 2004 with nothing but the mere memory of piano-making, Reamillo struggled to find the old piano-makers and re-create the construction of two pianos. "We built these pianos without any resource," he says. "We had no templates, no patterns, no devices. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Alwin Reamillo: On the Aesthetics of Flight
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.